Tag Archives: dietician hampshire

How to really have a more contented baby ;)

This being our second baby I’ve been a teeny, tiny bit wiser to a few things… and a bit slacker on other things! I’ve thrown out all the normal baby books for one and let baby lead the way, so much easier, he naturally showed me his routine. I also bypassed the puree route and went straight for baby led weaning – which I would highly recommend, much less stress and cooking.

Something I noticed with Miss K is how frustrated she would get when trying to communicate. Around a year I started using some basic signs with her and it made a big difference. So with J-boy I’ve put signing in from the instant we started weaning (5.5 months). It is lovely to see him now happily signing away. He does also use words with some of the signs too, however More, Milk and Moo are all very similar sounding so the signs are of big advantage. 

At age 2 toddles apparently recognise around 200 words but can only say about 50. I would be frustrated if I wanted something and couldn’t communicate it. Many times the reasons tantrums occur is due to frustration, so using signing can help with alleviating this.

Now I’m no signing expert, but hubby knows a fair bit of Makaton, so I’ve stolen signs from him and from groups I’ve been to. We use…

Eat

Drink

More

Finished

Please and Thankyou

Book

Milk

I like this free chart of signs: 

 baby-sign-language-chart

 

 

So at 15 months J-boy was using eat and drink and at 16 months he was using more and toothbrush. He doesn’t sign milk but says it. Now I plan to build in “nappy” and “sleep”. If he is potty trained and sleeping by 2 I’ll be a lucky mummy, ha ha!

It’s ok to play with your food

I was brought up to eat with my knife and fork, not to sing at the table, to keep my elbows well away and to definitely not play with my food.

My how things have changed! I’ve followed baby led weaning with my littlies so both have learnt to eat with their fingers…. Miss K (almost 4) still prefers fingers over cutlery and I can’t always argue as I eat some meals with my fingers too, for example rice and curry… It’s the only way.

I now often find myself slipping into song at the table. Part of that is having kids and part of that is just me… I sing a lot around the house.

Playing with food is part of what I do as a dietitian. I like my kids to feel the texture of foods and to get involved in cooking and preparing foods. So we keep mealtimes fun. It can be messy but the result is they eat almost anything and love learning about food.

So here are my little foodies in action.

Who wants manners when you have cuteness?

P.S – Very bad sound I know…. I NEED a new phone 😉

Baby led Weaning, let the adventure begin.

Call me weird but I love weaning. I know it’s super messy and requires a bit of time and energy but it’s so much fun! I love watching babies eat things for the first time, watching them learn and get better at feeding themselves, seeing their joy in it all and laughing a the mess they get themselves into. For me it’s a time of hilarity and inventiveness.

My baby boy has recently turned 6 months and started on solids. Being 6 months he can pretty much eat anything so I’ve started him straight on our family meals. His first few forays were steamed vegetables and fruit but after a few days he moved onto trying whatever we were eating. I’ve always cooked with no salt since we had our first baby so most meals are already suitable.

Dietitian Uk: Baby Led Weaning

Some examples of our meals at 6 months:

Breakfasts:
These are usually the same as it’s a rush in the mornings in our house. Readybrek with some fruit mashed in (banana, blueberries or stewed apple from my freezer stash).  Baby J feeds himself if I load up the spoon and give it to him.
 
Lunches:
Rice cakes with hummus and steamed carrots
Toast fingers with scrambled egg and cucumber
Pancakes with cream cheese and tomato
Ham sandwich with steamed pepper strips
 
Dinners:
Sweet potato wedges steamed with roasted peppers and courgettes (we had a sweet potato chilli).
Leek and mushroom risotto – he loves this.
Pasta in a tomato sauce with vegetables (I keep some vegetables in larger chunks for him).
Roast chicken with vegetables and roast potatoes
Homemade vegetable patties

 

Protein Packed Peanut Butter Trail Mix Cookies

Warning…. you may find it hard to stop at just one cookie!

I’ve slightly fallen back in love with peanut butter recently. It’s more nutritious than butter due to it’s protein content and gives a great taste to baking. So today inspired by my recent oaty ball success I decided to venture a little further into the peanut realm and try out some cookies.

Now I’ve seen plenty of peanut butter cookies on Pinterest, but they all seem to be full of chocolate, marshmallows or sweets. I wanted to create a healthier cookie that provides a tasty but nutritious snack. These were very easy to make and can be made ahead, then simply stored in the fridge ready to bake later. 

Attachment-1

The toddler’s response to these at snack time – “Mummy what are these” “Peanut butter cookies, why?” “They are yummy scrummy Mummy”. I must say I agree with her.

Dietitian UK: Peanut Butter Trail Mix Cookies

Peanut Butter Trail Mix Cookies
Yields 12
High protein, nutritious peanut butter cookies. Make them your own with different dried fruit and cereal for flavour and texture.
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Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
10 min
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
10 min
94 calories
11 g
16 g
5 g
3 g
1 g
24 g
50 g
3 g
0 g
3 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
24g
Yields
12
Amount Per Serving
Calories 94
Calories from Fat 41
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 5g
7%
Saturated Fat 1g
4%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 1g
Monounsaturated Fat 2g
Cholesterol 16mg
5%
Sodium 50mg
2%
Total Carbohydrates 11g
4%
Dietary Fiber 1g
5%
Sugars 3g
Protein 3g
Vitamin A
13%
Vitamin C
2%
Calcium
4%
Iron
6%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 100g (1/2 cup) peanut butter
  2. 1 egg
  3. 1 tsp baking powder
  4. 1/4 cup oats
  5. 1/4 cup raisins and dried apricots
  6. 1/4 cup dried chopped apricots
  7. 1/4 cup cornflakes
Instructions
  1. Mix the peanut butter, egg, oats and baking powder together.
  2. Now add in your mix of dried fruit and cereal. It will be thick and sticky, that is fine.
  3. Squidge the mixture firmly into balls, it will feel oily.
  4. Now lay onto greaseproof on a plate or baking tray and flatten slightly with your fingers.
  5. Place in the fridge for 2 hours - 2 days and then bake when ready.
  6. Bake at Gas Mark 5 for 10 minutes.
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calories
94
fat
5g
protein
3g
carbs
11g
more
Dietitian UK http://www.dietitianuk.co.uk/

Salmon and Vegetable Bake

I love fish but I sometimes struggle to get it into our weekly menu as hubby isn’t that keen on it. Anything with bones, a head or tails is definitely not allowed on the table (prawns excepted) and anything too fishy is also a no go.

So here is my latest fishy offering and this one went down well. The hubby said I could make it again and gave a few mmmmm noises. The toddler gave me a clap and said “Well done Mummy”, high praise indeed 🙂 

So why not give it a go and see how it fares with your family? Salmon is an oily fish providing omega 3’s and the vegetables will pack this meal up to provide 2 of your 5 a day. 

This meal can be prepared in advance then put in the oven to cook through later on.

 

Salmon and Vegetable Bake
Serves 3
A different way to serve up oily fish and veggies to your family.
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Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
45 min
Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
45 min
423 calories
35 g
83 g
14 g
41 g
5 g
425 g
601 g
9 g
0 g
5 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
425g
Servings
3
Amount Per Serving
Calories 423
Calories from Fat 126
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 14g
22%
Saturated Fat 5g
24%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 2g
Monounsaturated Fat 3g
Cholesterol 83mg
28%
Sodium 601mg
25%
Total Carbohydrates 35g
12%
Dietary Fiber 8g
32%
Sugars 9g
Protein 41g
Vitamin A
237%
Vitamin C
308%
Calcium
39%
Iron
22%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 3 medium carrots
  2. 1 large head of broccoli
  3. 300g salmon fillet in small cubes
  4. 50g gluten free cream cheese
  5. 100ml natural yoghurt
  6. 1 tsp mixed herbs
  7. seasoning
  8. 3 slices of gluten free bread made into breadcrumbs
  9. 50g grated cheddar cheese
Instructions
  1. Peel and chop the carrots then cook in boiling water until soft, add the broccoli for the last few minutes of cooking.
  2. Place the salmon and vegetables in a large bowl.
  3. Mix the cream cheese and yoghurt together with the herbs and season.
  4. Stir the creamy mix into the salmon and veggies.
  5. Spoon it all into an ovenproof dish, then top with the breadcrumbs and finally the cheese.
  6. Bake for 35-40 minutes at Gas Mark 6/200C.
  7. Serve with a green salad.
Notes
  1. Can be made ahead of time and cooked later and can be frozen.
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calories
423
fat
14g
protein
41g
carbs
35g
more
Dietitian UK http://www.dietitianuk.co.uk/
Why not serve this with a green salad and a cheeky glass of white wine?

Spiced Vegetable Moroccan Soup

The weather has turned distinctly chilly, so we’ve turned to soups for our lunches. I love soups as they really are easy to make, they can be an easy way to get vegetables and great nurtitious food into the family and they heat up the insides. This soup was a bit of an experiment, it has a different edge to it with the cinnamon, cumin and lemon. It really does work and makes a fresh, tingly on the tastebuds soup. 

To make this a complete lunch we ate ours wih rice cakes and finished with a yoghurt.

Spiced Moroccan Vegetable Soup
Serves 5
A zingy, spiced vegetable soup inspired by Moroccan flavours, quick, easy, healthy, low fat and packed with goodness.
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Print
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
20 min
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
20 min
160 calories
36 g
0 g
2 g
4 g
0 g
203 g
94 g
5 g
0 g
1 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
203g
Servings
5
Amount Per Serving
Calories 160
Calories from Fat 18
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 2g
3%
Saturated Fat 0g
2%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0g
Monounsaturated Fat 1g
Cholesterol 0mg
0%
Sodium 94mg
4%
Total Carbohydrates 36g
12%
Dietary Fiber 3g
12%
Sugars 5g
Protein 4g
Vitamin A
246%
Vitamin C
45%
Calcium
6%
Iron
14%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 1/2 tbsp olive oil
  2. 1 onion finely chopped
  3. 2 garlic cloves
  4. 1 tsp cinnamon
  5. 1 tsp cumin
  6. 1 chopped chilli
  7. 2 tbsp tomato puree
  8. 150g dried apricots chopped
  9. zest 1 lemon
  10. juice 1/2 lemon or 4 tbsp
  11. 4 carrots
  12. 150ml stock
  13. 200g greens (spinach, kale or Swiss chard)
Instructions
  1. Gently cook the onion, then add the garlic, cinnamon, cumin, chilli and tomato puree. Cook for a couple of minutes.
  2. Add the chopped apricpts, lemon zest and lemon juice, stir.
  3. Now add the carrots, greens and stock.
  4. Simmer for 20 minutes, then blend.
beta
calories
160
fat
2g
protein
4g
carbs
36g
more
Dietitian UK http://www.dietitianuk.co.uk/

Visualisation leads to better dietary change

An interesting piece of research caught my eye this week. A team of psychology researchers in Montreal looked into how using mental imagery techniques may increase the likelihood of people eating more fruit and vegetables. They asked 177 students to aim to eat more fruit over the next 7 days. Those who planned, wrote it down and visualised how they were going to do it (e.g. where and when they would buy, prepare and eat the fruit) were twice as likely to increase their consumption.

 Plant-Based-Foods

This was based on sports psychology. “Athletes do lots of work mentally rehearsing their performances before competing and it’s often very successful. So we thought having people mentally rehearse how they were going to buy and eat their fruit should make it more likely that they would actually do it. And this is exactly what happened,” says Bärbel Knäuper.

 

As a dietitian part of my job is helping people plan how they will manage to alter their eating habits so this research is further evidence that planning really is key. Talking through with someone what your long term goals are, how you can put them into place and having a short term goal to achieve are vital components of achieving dietary change.

 

 

Reference:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21337259