Tag Archives: southampton

Easy Peasy Star Biscuits

So when your toddler asks to make star biscuits, you can’t really say No. I’m not a fan of my kids having too much sugar so we always are on the look out for ways to reduce the sugar content of our baking, here we have used just a little apple juice and it worked well. A plain biscuit but you could add spices to it and make it your own. The plain biscuits are good for weaning too.

I used a greek yoghurt topping so the kids could decorate their biscuits which they loved. You need to only decorate the ones you aret going to eat there and then. Store the rest in a tin and the topping in the fridge. The decorating was a good after school activity and make your own snack session.

 

Easy Peasy Star Bicuits
Yields 20
Simple, low sugar star biscuits that you can add spices to and make your own.
Write a review
Print
67 calories
8 g
1 g
3 g
1 g
1 g
19 g
4 g
0 g
0 g
2 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
19g
Yields
20
Amount Per Serving
Calories 67
Calories from Fat 30
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 3g
5%
Saturated Fat 1g
3%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 1g
Monounsaturated Fat 1g
Cholesterol 1mg
0%
Sodium 4mg
0%
Total Carbohydrates 8g
3%
Dietary Fiber 1g
3%
Sugars 0g
Protein 1g
Vitamin A
3%
Vitamin C
0%
Calcium
1%
Iron
1%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 100g wholemeal or rye flour
  2. 100g plain white flour
  3. 1/2 tsp baking powder
  4. 75g margarine
  5. 75ml apple juice
Topping
  1. 1 tbsp Greek yoghurt and 1 tbsp cream cheese mixed with a dask of milk
  2. sunflower seeds
  3. chopped dried fruit
Instructions
  1. Weigh out the flour and baking powder.
  2. Rub the butter into the flour and baking powder mix.
  3. Add the apple juice and mix to a dough.
  4. Roll out on a floured surface.
  5. Cut and put onto a greased and lined baking tray.
  6. Bake at Gas Mark 4 for 15 minutes.
  7. Eat as they are or top with the Greek yoghurt mix.
beta
calories
67
fat
3g
protein
1g
carbs
8g
more
Dietitian UK http://www.dietitianuk.co.uk/

Should we label a food as good or bad?

The label of good and bad foods annoys me. It is one of those labels that I find hard to get away from when I am talking to people as it comes up constantly. I spend a lot of time trying to break that idea down in people’s minds. Google it and there are over 71,800,000 links talking about what foods are good/bad, what bad foods are really good, the best good foods to eat and so on. But do good and bad foods really exist?

Bad foods seem to be ones that are high in sugar, fats and calories. Foods that are “not healthy” and that exert a “bad” affect on the body. They can range from fast food, processed food and high fat/high calorie snack items to carbohydrates and dried fruit.

Dietitian UK: Should we label foods as good and bad?

We have a complex relationship with food. Trying to make it fit into just one camp is tricky. Look at the major food groups – carbohydrates, protein, fat, dairy, fruit and veggies. Then look at lentils. They are put in the protein group but they contain carbs and are a portion of veggies too. 

Let’s take it to a more philosophical level. Can a person be labelled as good or bad? Take an object like a razor blade. Is it good or bad? One the one hand it can be used to shave and on the other hand it could be used as a weapon. 

So by trying to label foods as good or bad we are over-simplifying it. Foods are really neutral. Labelling them automatically places them into one category. Let’s take chocolate as an example. On the one hand this is a high calorie, high fat food that is often laden with sugar, so could be classed as a “bad food”. However dark chocolate contains iron, magnesium and fibre. It has antioxidants including polyphenols, catchins and flavanols and may help lower blood pressure plus reduce LDL cholesterol levels. Some research suggests it may help with cognitive function too making it sound like a pretty amazing food to be eating. Even fruit and vegetables can have their negatives, too many carrots can turn the skin orange due to excessive beta carotene!

No single food is to my knowledge nutritionally complete. We need a combination of foods in order to provide the body with all the nutrients it needs. This includes the full range of essential fatty acids and some sugar too.

The old phrase “All things in moderation” is actually very true. Instead of looking at a food in isolation we need to think about how often we eat a food, how much or it we eat, combined with what else we are eating and adding to a food. Limiting or not allowing yourself to eat certain foods can actually lead to you craving them more and then over-eating them. Food is something to be enjoyed rather than denied, so a small amount of the things you like really can be good. 

So instead of labelling foods as good and bad, or healthy and not healthy, how about we change the way we view it. I let my children eat all foods, including cake, sweets and chocolate. However they know that some foods are best to eat in small amounts as they can lead to their bodies getting sick. A good example of this is a weekend recently where we had multiple parties, leading to a lot of party food being consumed. Both children had tummy aches and were slightly constipated! An excellent time to highlight that they had eaten more biscuits and cakes, less fruit and veggies and their bodies were complaining. We talked about how these foods are delicious (the words of my toddler boy) but if you eat too much of them they can make you feel unwell. 

How do you label food in your mind? 

Cocao Power Balls

You know those moments when you have a craving for chocolate? For me it is usually mid afternoon, that lull part of the day. Or just before teaching a class, when I need a pick-me-up and energy boost. So I created these beauties to help me, as I’m kind I thought I would share 😉 Now who wants one?

Dietitian UK: Cocao Power balls 2

Note: these are delicious and easy to make, but you do get messy hands!

Packed with nuts and dried fruit I find these great to grab 1 of as I’m on my way to teach a class. My children like them as part of their pudding calling them “chocolate balls”.

Miss K: “Mummy can I have more of those chocolate balls? I wasn’t sure about them on first bite but they are scrummy”

Shall I tell her they don’t actually have chocolate in them?

Dietitian UK: Cocao Power balls

Cocao Power Balls
Yields 8
A power packed healthy treat with that chocolatey hit.
Write a review
Print
Prep Time
10 min
Prep Time
10 min
119 calories
17 g
0 g
5 g
3 g
1 g
31 g
1 g
8 g
0 g
4 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
31g
Yields
8
Amount Per Serving
Calories 119
Calories from Fat 45
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 5g
8%
Saturated Fat 1g
4%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 1g
Monounsaturated Fat 3g
Cholesterol 0mg
0%
Sodium 1mg
0%
Total Carbohydrates 17g
6%
Dietary Fiber 2g
10%
Sugars 8g
Protein 3g
Vitamin A
0%
Vitamin C
0%
Calcium
2%
Iron
5%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 100g dates
  2. 75g nuts
  3. 60g oats
  4. 2 tsp cocao powder
  5. 1 tbsp water
Instructions
  1. Blitz the nuts in a coffee grinder or chop them into small pieces with a sharp knife. I use the nuts and seeds grinder on my Kenwood Chef. I used a mixed of walnuts, hazelnuts and cashews.
  2. Remove the nuts and place in a bowl.
  3. Now blitz up or finely chop the dates, add a splash of water if needed to help as they are sticky!
  4. Add to the nuts and mix in the cocao and a little water if needed to help it all bind. You can pop it in a stand mixer at this point and save your arms.
  5. Roll into small balls and you are done!
beta
calories
119
fat
5g
protein
3g
carbs
17g
more
Dietitian UK http://www.dietitianuk.co.uk/

Help, my child won’t eat his veggies!

We are firmly in a fussy eating stage, frustrating is the word. I currently have Miss K who will eat pretty much any fruit or vegetable and the J boy is decidedly anti-vegetables. I’ve tried explaining the evidence behind why vegetables are so good for you, talking him through the nutritional benefits (I know, he is only 22 months right now but they understand more than we think, right?)… but he still insists on not eating that veg. His current trick is to pick up a carrot, tell me rabbits eat them and pop it on my plate. Hilarious.

Dietitian UK: Help my child won't eat vegetables!

To be fair we have been through very bad chicken pox, an infection and now teething, so I fully well know why he is being fussy. However it still grates with me.

So I’ve been coming up with all kinds of inventive ways to get those veggies in. I’ve found that actually he likes the taste but is less keen on them in their whole form.  Grated is fine, added to muffins and flapjacks is fine, chopped up small on pinwheels works, blended in a sauce is all ok, but not in chunks on the plate. However I have persistently kept on offering them at each meal, hoping it will pay off. We have a few fail safe options including raw mushrooms, baked beans and spinach, kale or chard. 

Then today at lunchtime, a complete surprise. The J boy asked for avocado, not unusual as his sister was having some and he hates to be left out. I reluctantly gave him some expecting to get it put back on my plate in a squished, licked form… but he ate it and asked for more. 

© Alexstar | Dreamstime.com - Avocado Photo
© Alexstar | Dreamstime.com – Avocado Photo

So I’m just sharing for those of you in that frustrated place. It will pass. Fussy eating does not last for ever. 

All we can do as parents is to keep on offering healthy food, be good role models, stay calm and let them choose with no pressure.

Men Get Eating Disorders Too

Eating disorders are not something we generally associate with men, there is a huge stigma attached if you do have an eating disorder and it’s not an issue frequently discussed. So I was so pleased to come across the Men Have Eating Disorders Too (MGEDT) charity. I was even happier to find they had a conference running within travelling distance for me. So off to Brighton I went. Below are some of my take home points.

Eating-Disorders-Have-No-Gender

The prevelance of ED in men is 40%, this is a huge statistic and I certainly don’t find this in my clinical practice which suggests there are men with ED who are not seeking help. A recurring theme throughout the day was the lack of specific treatments and treatment pathways for men. Services are aimed at treating females not males.

Gender differences mean that there needs to be a different approach to treat men. Therapy, group work and literature all needs to be adapted. One talk was looking at whether we need a specialist inpatient unit for men. Rather than fitting men into a standard ED unit, which can lead to them feeling isolated  and like they stick out, how about providing a place specficially set up to treat and help them? It’s an interesting question and I can really see the benefits of doing this.

Back to the gender differences that came out over the day. These show how our current society can lead to incorrect beliefs and values that are unhelpful and can perpetuate an eating disorder. Have a think about whether any of these are core beliefs you hold.

 Incorrect Core Beliefs/Assumptions:

  1. THE BELIEF: Eating disorders are something only women get, so I am less of a man if I have one. Sexuality: eating disorders are primarily a female issue so there can be a thought that if you are male with an eating disorder you are less of a man…… or you are homosexual as gay men are usually more concerned with their weight and shape. The statistics actually show that this is not true, most men with eating disorders are not gay and a lot of men have an eating disorder it is just not talked about often.
  2. THE BELIEF: If I have an eating disorder I am weak. Male Identity – the image of a man being strong, muscular and able to cope. Having an eating disorder makes you vulnerable, it breaks you. Asking for help can be the hardest thing to do. It can therefore be hard to seek help.
  3. THE BELIEF: Men have to look a certain way. Body Image – over the years the media stereotype has changed to one of a man being muscular with broad shoulders, a large chest and a small waist. Not a very achievable look of course. Often we see the female stereotype and not the male one. 
  4. THE BELIEF: Men eat and drink a certain way, I need to do this to fit it. Male eating habits – it is seen as ok for men to eat large portions and overeat which can make binge eating acceptable. Certain foods and drinks are seen as more “manly” – beer and red meat for example. What if you don’t actually like those foods or are not the kind of man who likes going to the pub for a pint? 
  5. THE BELIEF: Real Men don’t cry, express emotion or talk about how they feel. Men don’t always like to talk about their feelings – again this can be linked to not wanting to be seen as vulnerable as this is a sign of being a girl or being weak. So it can make it even harder for a man to step out and seek help. Whereas actually we know that talking about your feelings really works and helps.

 Men come in all kinds of shapes and sizes, like all kinds of foods, can love to express their emotions and are all INDIVIDUAL. Don’t be afraid to be the man you were made to be. Seek help if you need it, therapy is an amazing tool.

If you are a professional be aware, there are more men out there with eating disorders than you may think. 

For posters and resources see the Men Get Eating Disorders Too website.

 

SaveSave

My Favourite Cookery Books

I have a lot of cookery books. Well over 50, I try hard to justify this as “I need them for work purposes” or “I cook a lot” but I will admit to it being a slight obsession. I just love to sit down and read recipes! Every now and again I try and have a cull, which rarely works that well. There are some I rarely used but I keep thinking that I may need them. Send help please!

So whilst sifting through my shelves for a recipe I thought I would do a quick post on my favourite cookery books.

Dietitian UK: My Favourite Cookery Books

1. The Dairy Book of Home Cookery: this had to have a place as it is my oldest cookery book. My mum bought this from the milkman many years ago and I learnt to cook from it. So when I went to Uni, this book went with me. It was known as the cookery Bible for many years and I still refer to it now for basic classic recipes such as souffles, fairy cakes, scones and sauces.

2. The Womens Weekly Indian Step by Step Book: I have quite a few of this range of books and love them all. The Chinese and the Thai ones are well used in my house too. Although I cook curry frequently I like variety, this book provides really good curry recipes that are simple to follow but taste amazing.

3. Healthy Gluten Free Eating: If you are looking for a good starter gluten free cookbook then I would highly recommend this one. I dip into it for inspiration and ideas, mainly the baking section. I wouldn’t call the cakes “healthy” but they are delicious treats!

4. Seriously Good Gluten-Free Cooking: This book was a gift from a lodger who was Coeliac. I’ve used lots of the savoury recipes from it and the birthday cake. In fact I must go back into it and find more recipes to use! We regularly cook the leek risotto for family meals and there are some lovely ideas for entertaining, great salads and accompaniments such as dips, sauces and relishes.

5. Jamies’s 30 Minute Meals: I bought this for hubby to give to me for Christmas 😉 Now I must admit to never making a whole meal from the book from start to finish, but it is one of those books I dip into and take recipes from different pages to create a meal. I love the concept but with 2 small children this is more of a book I use when people come for dinner or for weekend cookery.

6. My Daddy Cooks: I love this book. I’ve worked my way through a lot of the recipes and there are a number that are now firm family favourites. Nick Coffer has hit the nail on the head with recipes that are family friendly in terms of being able to cook them with the kids, around the kids and the kids enjoy eating them. We love the Sticky baked Salmon noodles and the Jambalaya. This is a recipe book that I should really get my husband to start using as it is simple, well written and some of the recipes really are fool-proof!

What are your favourite cookery books? I’d love to hear. I’m off to read a few more recipes now I have all the books out 🙂

Welcome 2015, resolve to relax.

2014 you were officially a whirlwind. With a baby, a preschooler and 2 businesses to run I had to cut maternity leave short and get right back into the craziness of working around my littlies. Trust me this is not recommended and leads to generalised chaos, very little sleep and a never ending to-do list. 

2014 you were also full of celebration and new things. I love hanging with my small ones, being around daily to watch them grown and develop is so amazing. One of my sayings is to “celebrate the small successes in life”.  The baby saying “Moo” and pointing to a cow, Miss K, aged 4 putting a fresh toilet roll on the holder for the first time (all by herself, with no prompting) when she finished the last of the old roll. Little things, but lovely to take a moment and celebrate.

2014 was a huge learning curve. I’ve learnt more about social media, business, Pilates, nutrition, motherhood, cooking, recipe development, mental health, IBS and myself. Good job I love to learn.

I love a new year. It’s like a fresh notebook, clean pages, endless stories to fill it in with. So 2015, I look forward to seeing what you bring.

I don’t really make resolutions…  but this year I’ve a few small ones:

Dietitian UK: 2015 Resolve to Relax

1. To relax more. I felt like I was working all the hours I possibly could towards the end of 2014, yet still not getting everything done. So I’m going at it from a more backwards approach and builing in more relaxation time. My key will be to make this structured relaxation time. So it is put in my diary as set work/relaxing time.

2. To book in some CPD courses. Now the baby boy is big enough to be left all day I am looking forward to getting stuck into some day courses. I’ve already booked one. Go me.

3. To be more selective about what work I take on… and what I work I turn down. This has always been a hard one for me, but now with so much going on I know I can’t do it all. 

4. To get away more. A break away from work always helps put life in perspective and gives us much needed family time, even for a night. So I’ve already booked some holiday time, something to really look forward to.

5. To see more of friends. Having lost a dear friend recently I want to make sure I treasure my friendships and invest in them.

Notice none of these are about diet or detoxing? You weren’t expected them to be were you?! #trustadietitian

 

Gingerbread Biscuits: Wheatfree and gluten free.

We’ve been doing an activity advent calander this year, which has been a lot of fun. Each day I’ve planned out and put a different Christmas themed activity in our advent calander. It’s meant I’ve been able to plan in all the little things I’ve wanted to do with the kids and it’s made me be organised! However I have also been able to swap activities around as long as I get to the calander before Miss K. That happened last weekend, when I had been planning to do some Christmas baking with the small ones, but a close friend died and so I opted for Christmas colouring instead so we could go to the celebration service. 

So this weekend, we got stuck into the baking. I’d never made gluten/wheat free gingerbread before, it was great fun to make. Miss K enjoyed weighing out things, licking bowls, eating dough, rolling and cutting out biscuits.  I’m now having to hide the tin as it’s so tasty I’m sure it will go too fast!

DSC_3592

 

DSC_3591

Dietitian UK: Wheat/gluten free Gingerbread

 

Gingerbread (wheat/glutenfree)
Yields 40
A simple to make wheat/gluten free gingerbread perfect for Christmas gifts, to hang on the tree or to eat yourself!
Write a review
Print
Prep Time
30 min
Cook Time
15 min
Prep Time
30 min
Cook Time
15 min
77 calories
12 g
7 g
3 g
1 g
2 g
18 g
34 g
4 g
0 g
1 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
18g
Yields
40
Amount Per Serving
Calories 77
Calories from Fat 23
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 3g
4%
Saturated Fat 2g
8%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0g
Monounsaturated Fat 1g
Cholesterol 7mg
2%
Sodium 34mg
1%
Total Carbohydrates 12g
4%
Dietary Fiber 0g
1%
Sugars 4g
Protein 1g
Vitamin A
2%
Vitamin C
0%
Calcium
1%
Iron
1%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 350g plain gluten free flour (I used Doves Farm)
  2. 1 tsp bicarbonate soda
  3. 2 tsp ground ginger
  4. 125g butter
  5. 125g brown sugar
  6. 50g black treacle
  7. 50g golden syrup
  8. Extra flour to dust and roll out
Instructions
  1. Mix the flour, bicarbonate of soda and ginger together.
  2. Run in the butter.
  3. Mix in the sugar.
  4. Weigh out the treacle and syrup, heat gently to soften (I did this for 1 minute in the microwave)
  5. Make a well in the flour mix and pour in the wet mix. Stir and then knead to a dough.
  6. Roll out onto a floured board, keep it pretty thin, we went for about 1/4 inch.
  7. Preheat the oven to Gas Mark 5.
  8. Go crazy with your Christmas cutters and transfer carefully to a greased, lined baking tray (we used a palate knife for this).
  9. Bake for 10-15 minutes, stay close and check them regularly so they don't catch around the edges.
  10. Leave to cool for 5 minutes on the baking tray and then transfer to a plate or wire rack.
Notes
  1. As the baby was asleep we made this by hand, but you could easily use a food processor to speed the process up.
beta
calories
77
fat
3g
protein
1g
carbs
12g
more
Dietitian UK http://www.dietitianuk.co.uk/
Dietitian UK: Wheat/gluten free Gingerbread

DSC_3597

Roasted Red pepper Hummus

Hummus is a firm favourite in our house and one of our staple lunches. I tend soak the dried chickpeas overnight then cook them at breakfast ready to whizz up at lunch. The dried beans are more faff but cheaper, especially when you have hummus monsters in your home.

I love all the flavours or hummus you can buy, but prefer a healthier twist on hummus so am starting to make variations at home. Adding vegetables to things is always a hit with me.

Here is our roasted red pepper recipe.
You could roast the peppers in the oven or even used ones from a jar. I didn’t have time or the jar variety so used the gas cooker approach.

It took me the length of time it takes to feed 2 rabbits, put them in their run and do a dusting dance with a feather duster 😉 that’s 10 minutes.

Perfect for kids, weaning, Christmas buffets or as a snack.

IMG_7445.JPG

Roasted Red Pepper Hummus
Serves 12
A healthy hummus recipe that uses red peppers and chickpeas.
Write a review
Print
108 calories
14 g
0 g
4 g
4 g
1 g
35 g
7 g
3 g
0 g
3 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
35g
Servings
12
Amount Per Serving
Calories 108
Calories from Fat 36
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 4g
6%
Saturated Fat 1g
3%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 1g
Monounsaturated Fat 2g
Cholesterol 0mg
0%
Sodium 7mg
0%
Total Carbohydrates 14g
5%
Dietary Fiber 4g
16%
Sugars 3g
Protein 4g
Vitamin A
7%
Vitamin C
23%
Calcium
3%
Iron
8%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 250g dried chickpeas
  2. 1 red pepper
  3. 100ml natural yoghurt
  4. 2 tbsp olive oil
  5. 2 garlic cloves
  6. 1 tbsp tahini
  7. Juice of half a lemon
  8. Black pepper
Instructions
  1. Soak the dried chickpeas overnight or use 2 tins of chickpeas.
  2. Boil the dried chick peas for 40 minutes or until they are soft.
  3. Cook the pepper on a gas hob. Place a skewer in it, turn on the gas and place the pepper on top, turning every few minutes. The skin will blacken, do not panic! This is fine.
  4. Then place the slightly cooled pepper in a plastic food bag and rub the skin off with your fingers.
  5. Chop the pepper a little and remove the seeds.
  6. Place all ingredients in a food processor and blend until smooth.
beta
calories
108
fat
4g
protein
4g
carbs
14g
more
Dietitian UK http://www.dietitianuk.co.uk/
Dietitian UK: Roasted Red Pepper Hummus

Fruit and Nut Balls (gluten free, wheat free, dairy free)

It’s been a while since I’ve had time to get my creative side out. A few weeks of my husband being tied up with things has meant I’ve been pretty much keeping the show on the road by running around like a juggling magician 😉 Keeping 2 small ones fed, vaguely clean, amused, pretending to have a tidy house and running 2 businesses is….. well busy. You know those moments when you are cooking dinner with a baby on your back in a sling, whilst helping the toddler find her prized possession and aware you are teaching Pilates in 10 minutes – well that. You know what, it’s tiring as heck, but I LOVE MY JOBS. 

So in preparation for another busy week myself and Miss K took full advantage of Master J napping, we busted our moves in the kitchen. In fits of excitement, under a watchful eye, Miss K pretty much made cheese straws on her own, meanwhile I knocked up these fruit and nut balls. They were so quick to make that she asked me – “Mummy, when did you make those?”.

Dietitian Uk: Fruit and Nut Balls

My food processor is on it’s very last legs but it just managed to grind the nuts and seeds (hint hint Santa). If you don’t have a food processor a coffee grinder would work, bash them in a pestle and mortar chop them nice and small. The resulting mix will be sticky and slightly oily as the fruit and nuts release their goodness.

Fruit and Nut Balls
Yields 20
Cranberry, date, almond, walnut and sunflower seeds make a health-filled snack perfect to boost your energy levels for on-the-go people.
Write a review
Print
Prep Time
15 min
Prep Time
15 min
242 calories
22 g
0 g
17 g
6 g
2 g
50 g
1 g
14 g
0 g
14 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
50g
Yields
20
Amount Per Serving
Calories 242
Calories from Fat 141
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 17g
26%
Saturated Fat 2g
8%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 9g
Monounsaturated Fat 5g
Cholesterol 0mg
0%
Sodium 1mg
0%
Total Carbohydrates 22g
7%
Dietary Fiber 4g
16%
Sugars 14g
Protein 6g
Vitamin A
0%
Vitamin C
0%
Calcium
5%
Iron
7%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 200g walnuts
  2. 200g almonds
  3. 200g sunflower seeds
  4. 200g dried cranberries
  5. 200g dates
Instructions
  1. Place all the ingredients in a food processor and blitz until the nuts are in small pieces.
  2. Now 1tbsp at a time, squeeze in your hands and roll into balls.
  3. Place onto a plate and put in the fridge. You can eat them straight from the fridge or after an hour remove and place in a tub/tin lined with greaseproof paper.
beta
calories
242
fat
17g
protein
6g
carbs
22g
more
Dietitian UK http://www.dietitianuk.co.uk/