Category Archives: Snacks

Kiwi Frozen Yoghurt

This week I had passed to me 14 very ripe kiwi fruit. Too ripe to just eat, but I just can’t see food go to waste. It was a hot day, my small people had already asked for ice-lollies so this was the logical step. 

The result is something good. I love that tang you get with kiwi…. so here you get the tanginess along with the sweetness of the banana and the yoghurt adds the creaminess. 

It made enough to fill my ice-cream maker bowl, so about 1 litre. 

WARNING: it is addictively delicious, but thankfully very healthy.

Kiwi are packed with vitamin C, they also provide some fibre, potassium, vitamin E and folate. With a range of phytochemicals in them such as carotenes and flavonoids they pack a fair punch of hefty goodness that will help fight antioxidants. A study in 2000 on 18,000 Italian children found that eating 5-7 portions of kiwi/citrus fruit per week reduced wheezing by 44% and shortness of breath by 32%.  

Also known as chinese gooseberries as they were originally grown in China, then taken over to New Zealand in the early 20th century. To test if they are ripe you can press gently with your thumb and finger at the ends, there should be a little bit of give.

Kiwi Froyo 1
Before freezing
Kiwi Froyo1
In the ice cream maker
Kiwi Frozen Yoghurt
Serves 12
Super simply and healthy frozen yoghurt recipe.
Write a review
Print
58 calories
14 g
0 g
0 g
1 g
0 g
90 g
3 g
8 g
0 g
0 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
90g
Servings
12
Amount Per Serving
Calories 58
Calories from Fat 4
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 0g
1%
Saturated Fat 0g
0%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0g
Monounsaturated Fat 0g
Cholesterol 0mg
0%
Sodium 3mg
0%
Total Carbohydrates 14g
5%
Dietary Fiber 3g
11%
Sugars 8g
Protein 1g
Vitamin A
2%
Vitamin C
126%
Calcium
3%
Iron
2%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 14 over-ripe kiwi
  2. 1 ripe banana
  3. 250ml natural or Greek yoghurt
Instructions
  1. If using an ice-cream maker freeze the bowl in advance (or make this up, pop in the fridge until the ice-cream maker bowl is cold).
  2. Peel the kiwi and banana and cut into chunks. Place in a food processor.
  3. Blitz to a puree.
  4. Add the yoghurt and mix.
  5. Pop into the ice-cream maker and let it churn.
  6. Freeze whatever you don’t eat.
  7. If you are not using an ice-cream maker then pop into a bowl and freeze.
beta
calories
58
fat
0g
protein
1g
carbs
14g
more
Dietitian UK https://www.dietitianuk.co.uk/

Why eating nuts can aid weight control.

A few things you may not know about almonds

The nutrition basics:

  • Almonds have a proven heart health claim. This is due to being high in monounsaturated fat and their vitamin E content. They are the tree nut with the highest amount of vitamin E. Proven to lower total and LDL cholesterol.
  • 1 handful of almonds contain a similar amount of polyphenols to 1 cup of green tea. 
  • They are low in glycaemic index and when eaten together they can lower the impact on blood sugars of other carbohydrate foods. 
  • 1 serving (1 oz) contains 12 vitamins and minerals (including folic acid, niacin, magnesium, vitamin B6, zinc, copper and potassium) and 6 g protein. This protein helps provide a powerful satiating effect, so they keep you fuller for longer.
  • They are the nuts with the longest shelf life.
  • You need 2 types of almond trees present for pollination, as the bees need to carry pollen from 1 type of almond tree to another.

Heart Health:

2 large studies show the heart health benfits of nuts:

1. Nurses’ Health Study (over 86,000 nurses followed over 14 years)

2. the Adventist Health Study (followed over 27,000 men)

Dietitian UK: Why almonds are so good for you

In total these studies assessed the diets of over 110,000 men and women and after adjusting for other risk factors they linked the intake of five or more servings of nuts per week to a 35 – 50 percent reduction in risk of coronary heart disease incidence and death.

If nuts are high in fat, won’t eating them make me fat?

It sounds like common sense doesn’t it. However the evidence begs to differ. Nut eaters tend to come out at a lower body weight than non-nut eaters. Here is one example for you:

A 24 week weight loss interventional study on obese women compared:

Group A who ate 84g of almonds per day, equivalent to 3 portions of almonds per day. 

A low calorie diet 

39% total fat, 25% MUFA and 32% carbohydrate

Group B on a low calorie, complex carbohydrate diet. 

(18% total fat, 5% MUFA and 53% carbohydrate)

Both diets were equivalent calories and protein. The results showed a 62% greater reduction in weight/BMI, 50% greater reduction in waist circumference and 56% greater reduction in Fat mass in the almond-group.

Int J Obesity Related Metabolic Disease (2003): 27: 1365.

The Reasoning:

Firstly….You don’t absorb all the calories from nuts. That fact blew me away the first time I heard it and understood it. In fact I know now that we absorb different amounts calories from different nuts. The research is ongoing on this and some of it so new it is yet to be published. for the same nuts there is then a difference in the amount of energy we absorb for different nut products – whole, chopped, nut butters.

Secondly…. the calorie content of foods is not that accurate. It is calculated using conversion factors rather than being measured.  Digestibility is not taken into account. If we measured the urinary and fecal energy after eating almonds we would get a more accurate figure, but just getting someone to eat only almonds so we can so this is an extreme task. Some new research has looked at another way of doing this using a base diet with and without almonds. This highlighted that there is a definite difference between the food label calorie content and the measured calorie content of nuts.

The real calorie content of nuts is 5-21% lower than the labels tell us. It varies depending on the type of nut and the processing of the nut. 

Take Home Message:

Nuts are good, no, GREAT for you when eaten in sensible portion sizes. Obviously overeating them can lead to excess calorie intake and weight gain. However,  when eaten daily, in portion controlled amounts, they can help with weight control, satiety and provide a good heart health benefit too.

I personally love the portion tins you can get. 

Portion:

A portion is described as: 1 oz, 2 tbsp, a small handful, 30g.

In actual numbers of nuts this is:

23 almonds, 18 cashews, 12 hazelnuts, 8 brazil nuts ,35 peanuts, 15 pecan halves or 14 walnut halves.

Dietitian UK: Nuts portion guide

 

 

Disclaimer: I recently attended a Round Table event for the Almond B0ard of California. Some of the information in this post has come from that day. This post was not paid for, nor was I asked to write it, it just interests me!

Cocao Power Balls

You know those moments when you have a craving for chocolate? For me it is usually mid afternoon, that lull part of the day. Or just before teaching a class, when I need a pick-me-up and energy boost. So I created these beauties to help me, as I’m kind I thought I would share 😉 Now who wants one?

Dietitian UK: Cocao Power balls 2

Note: these are delicious and easy to make, but you do get messy hands!

Packed with nuts and dried fruit I find these great to grab 1 of as I’m on my way to teach a class. My children like them as part of their pudding calling them “chocolate balls”.

Miss K: “Mummy can I have more of those chocolate balls? I wasn’t sure about them on first bite but they are scrummy”

Shall I tell her they don’t actually have chocolate in them?

Dietitian UK: Cocao Power balls

Cocao Power Balls
Yields 8
A power packed healthy treat with that chocolatey hit.
Write a review
Print
Prep Time
10 min
Prep Time
10 min
119 calories
17 g
0 g
5 g
3 g
1 g
31 g
1 g
8 g
0 g
4 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
31g
Yields
8
Amount Per Serving
Calories 119
Calories from Fat 45
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 5g
8%
Saturated Fat 1g
4%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 1g
Monounsaturated Fat 3g
Cholesterol 0mg
0%
Sodium 1mg
0%
Total Carbohydrates 17g
6%
Dietary Fiber 2g
10%
Sugars 8g
Protein 3g
Vitamin A
0%
Vitamin C
0%
Calcium
2%
Iron
5%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 100g dates
  2. 75g nuts
  3. 60g oats
  4. 2 tsp cocao powder
  5. 1 tbsp water
Instructions
  1. Blitz the nuts in a coffee grinder or chop them into small pieces with a sharp knife. I use the nuts and seeds grinder on my Kenwood Chef. I used a mixed of walnuts, hazelnuts and cashews.
  2. Remove the nuts and place in a bowl.
  3. Now blitz up or finely chop the dates, add a splash of water if needed to help as they are sticky!
  4. Add to the nuts and mix in the cocao and a little water if needed to help it all bind. You can pop it in a stand mixer at this point and save your arms.
  5. Roll into small balls and you are done!
beta
calories
119
fat
5g
protein
3g
carbs
17g
more
Dietitian UK https://www.dietitianuk.co.uk/

Banana Oaty Bars

 Mini-Disaster in our house usually means…. there is no flapjack left, we are out of milk, Miss K cannot find a very important item (insert “really not important in the grand scheme of life but a calamity to her”), or a section of the train track has come apart. I quite love the fact that these really are regular disasters in the eyes of my small ones. How simple life can be!

Today’s disaster led to a distraught 2 year old.

 1. The flapjack tin was empty

2. There were not enough oats to make more.

Super Mummy to the rescue. I rarely make the same recipe twice anyway 😉

So I adapted my semi-famous banana and sultana flapjack recipe by adding flour. It comes out less of a flapjack and more of an oat bar. Dense, oaty and firm – no crumbly texture here. A really good option to have with a cuppa, for lunch boxes or to feed a snacking child. They are sweet but not too sweet, if you know what I mean. The oats provide that wholegrain goodness, the banana and sultanas pack in the fruit and there is just a hint of honey and butter to bind it all.

It’s falls into that territory of “Is it a flapjack? Is is a cake? It is a bar?”

You know what? I can’t decide but all that really matters is it is healthy and yummy!

Dietitian UK: Banana Oaty Bars

Banana Oat Bars (wheat free, gluten free)
Yields 12
Quick, easy oat bar recipe that is healthy and great for hungry children.
Write a review
Print
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
20 min
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
20 min
118 calories
19 g
9 g
4 g
2 g
2 g
43 g
1 g
5 g
0 g
1 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
43g
Yields
12
Amount Per Serving
Calories 118
Calories from Fat 36
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 4g
6%
Saturated Fat 2g
11%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0g
Monounsaturated Fat 1g
Cholesterol 9mg
3%
Sodium 1mg
0%
Total Carbohydrates 19g
6%
Dietary Fiber 1g
6%
Sugars 5g
Protein 2g
Vitamin A
2%
Vitamin C
2%
Calcium
1%
Iron
3%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 100g oats (gluten free if needed)
  2. 100g plain flour (I used a gluten free blend)
  3. 100g sultanas
  4. 1 mashed banana
  5. 2 tbsp honey
  6. 50g butter
Instructions
  1. Mix the dry ingredients together, by hand or in a food processor/stand mixer.
  2. Melt the honey and butter together in a bowl and then add along with the banana.
  3. Mix well, I left this for a few minutes in my stand mixer.
  4. Press into a lined, greased baking tray, cover the top with foil for half of the cooking time to stop the sultanas getting burnt.
  5. Bake at Gas Mark 5 for 20-30 minutes.
beta
calories
118
fat
4g
protein
2g
carbs
19g
more
Dietitian UK https://www.dietitianuk.co.uk/

Lentil and Date Chocolate Brownies. A revelation!

It’s not often I get inspired to make brownies. Don’t get me wrong, I love a brownie, but they generally aren’t the healthiest thing you can bake and once you make a batch you have to eat them, right? So it’s usually flapjack in my cake tin.

However this week Miss K brought home a lentil brownie recipe in her bag from school and it intrigued me. Lentil in a brownie? Surely not. 

Dietitian UK: Lentil and Date Brownies 1

I’ve adapted the recipe slightly to lower the sugar and next time I would definitely add in pecans. You can’t beat a pecan in a brownie.

These were  a hands down winner. Easy to make (as long as you have lentils already cooked or cook them earlier in the day) and they baked whilst we ate dinner. I gave one to my hubby, he looked at me suspiciously and took a bite, then with a surprised voice told me they were really good. My poor family have to try a lot of dud baking as well as the good bits!

None of my children or husband even noticed the lentils. I had a faint taste of them, but I had made them so was probably a bit sensitive to the taste. A great way to lower the glycaemic index and make a higher protein version of a chocolate brownie.

Dietitian UK: Lentil and Date Brownies 2

Lentil and Date Brownies
Serves 10
Write a review
Print
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
20 min
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
20 min
83 calories
11 g
27 g
4 g
2 g
2 g
24 g
8 g
8 g
0 g
1 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
24g
Servings
10
Amount Per Serving
Calories 83
Calories from Fat 34
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 4g
6%
Saturated Fat 2g
11%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0g
Monounsaturated Fat 1g
Cholesterol 27mg
9%
Sodium 8mg
0%
Total Carbohydrates 11g
4%
Dietary Fiber 1g
4%
Sugars 8g
Protein 2g
Vitamin A
3%
Vitamin C
0%
Calcium
1%
Iron
3%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 45g cooked red lentils
  2. 1 egg
  3. 30g cacao powder
  4. 40g cacao butter or marg
  5. 40g sugar
  6. 60g dates chopped
Instructions
  1. Cook the lentils or use tinned.
  2. Chop the dates into small pieces.
  3. Mix all the ingredients together.
  4. Line a baking tray and spread the mixture in, you want it fairly thick.
  5. Bake at Gask Mark 5 for 20 minutes until it feels gently set.
  6. Leave to cool, cut and eat!
beta
calories
83
fat
4g
protein
2g
carbs
11g
more
Dietitian UK https://www.dietitianuk.co.uk/

Homemade “healthier” raw chocolate

I went on a conference a whilst ago and was served the most amazing RAW chocolate. It completely intrigued me so I of course asked for the recipe and then promptly filed it away for a later inspired moment. That moment came when I wanted to make some yummy, healthy inspired treats for my Pilates with Priya: “Pimp Your Pelvic Floor” course. Yes really. 

OH MY DAYS. This may mean I don’t buy chocolate every again. 

Well that’s a bit ambitious but it really is a great replacement for the bought version. I love 70%-85% dark chocolate. This bites the bullet. 

Nutritionally this isn’t that different to other shop bought high quality dark chocolate brands. However it is easy, therapeutic and fun to make, plus you can make it your own adding in flavours ….. the perfect gift for friends or a treat at the end of a dinner party perhaps?

Is it healthy? Well I rank it as healthier than milk chocolate and a little of what you like is definitely good 🙂 Cacao is a good source of antioxidants and contains magnesium. So as an alternative to chocolate this is a good way to go. Remember… all things in moderation 😉

 

DSC_6309

RAW Healthier Chocolate
Serves 6
Write a review
Print
141 calories
6 g
36 g
14 g
0 g
9 g
24 g
2 g
6 g
1 g
5 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
24g
Servings
6
Amount Per Serving
Calories 141
Calories from Fat 119
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 14g
21%
Saturated Fat 9g
43%
Trans Fat 1g
Polyunsaturated Fat 1g
Monounsaturated Fat 4g
Cholesterol 36mg
12%
Sodium 2mg
0%
Total Carbohydrates 6g
2%
Dietary Fiber 0g
0%
Sugars 6g
Protein 0g
Vitamin A
8%
Vitamin C
0%
Calcium
0%
Iron
0%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 100g/1cup Raw Cacao Powder
  2. 100g Cacao Butter
  3. 2 tbsp honey
Instructions
  1. Place the chopped cacao butter and powder in a bowl over a pan of hot water.
  2. Stir and allow it to melt gently and slowly.
  3. Add the honey in and stir well.
  4. Add in any additional flavours and stir.
  5. Pour into a baking tray, lined pot or small moulds and leave in the fridge to set for a couple of hours.
Try adding
  1. a twist of sea salt
  2. dried cranberries
  3. ginger
  4. raspberries
beta
calories
141
fat
14g
protein
0g
carbs
6g
more
Dietitian UK https://www.dietitianuk.co.uk/

 

Banana, Peanut Butter and Chocolate Chip Flapjack (WF, GF, DF).

It’s been a rainy summers week, so I felt the need to pimp up my own flapjack recipe to cheer us up. It’s a healthier take on a full fat, full syrup flapjack, perfect for a cuppa on a rainy day. What is even better is that I used peanut butter in it so my hubby won’t touch it 😉 I love using peanut butter in baking as it is lower in saturated fats, higher in the heart healthier monounsaturates and it also adds protein to help with satiety. The oats provide low glycaemic index carbs which can help stabilise blood sugars so also helping to keep you fuller for longer. It should provide for a healthy snack that will tide you over until your next meal.

Recipe creation for me provides an outlet for creativity and is almost a form of therapy as I switch off from “work” and get inspired by what is around me. It’s actually something I sometimes recommend to eating disorder clients, but they don’t have to eat it unless they want to. Often they love looking at recipes, love creating things and so being given the green light to go ahead and make things but not have to eat them can be quite releasing. 

So here is my latest flapjack. It’s a keeper. It is also wheat free, gluten free (if you use gluten free oats) and can be made dairy free if you use the right chocolate. GENIUS.

Dietitian UK: Peanut butter and choc flapjack

Banana, Peanut Butter and Chocolate Chip Flapjack
Yields 12
Write a review
Print
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
25 min
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
25 min
167 calories
21 g
2 g
7 g
6 g
2 g
51 g
46 g
7 g
0 g
5 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
51g
Yields
12
Amount Per Serving
Calories 167
Calories from Fat 63
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 7g
11%
Saturated Fat 2g
10%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 2g
Monounsaturated Fat 3g
Cholesterol 2mg
1%
Sodium 46mg
2%
Total Carbohydrates 21g
7%
Dietary Fiber 3g
13%
Sugars 7g
Protein 6g
Vitamin A
1%
Vitamin C
3%
Calcium
3%
Iron
6%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 200g oats (gluten free if needed)
  2. 100g peanut butter (I used a low sugar, low salt version)
  3. 80g chocolate chips or chopped up chocolate (Dairy free e.g. Booja Booja if needed)
  4. 2 mashed, over-ripe bananas
Instructions
  1. Mix it all together by hand or food mixer.
  2. Grease and line a baking tray.
  3. Spread it into the baking tray, so it is about 2cm thick.
  4. Bake at Gas Mark 5 for 25-30 minutes.
beta
calories
167
fat
7g
protein
6g
carbs
21g
more
Dietitian UK https://www.dietitianuk.co.uk/

Make your own Dried/Dehydrated Fruit

Soft fruit season. Part of me loves it and part of me dreads it. What to do with all the fruit off the trees? My new answer – DEHYDRATE it. So if you are in the UK this may sounds a bit crazy, most people who I have mentioned it to have raised at least 1 eyebrow at me. But it’s such a great way to use up that glut of fruit without being swamped in jam. I have already made 1 batch of jam, frozen tubs and tubs or fruit, made fruity flapjacks, cakes and given some fruit away…. and I still have 1 more fruit tree to strip bare. I would be drowning in fruit, except…. drumroll please… the dehydrator of glory is here. 

I  had been slyly eyeing one of these up for months and months, when one night I had a toddler who wouldn’t settle, an Iphone in my hand and an Amazon App. It’s a dangerous combination. Dehydrator researched and bought before the toddler had shut his eyes. My husband’s reaction when it arrived “What on earth is that” has since been turned to “How many tiers does it have and what temperature shall I set it too”. It’s a hit.

The first thing I dehydrated was courgette. Now that was a bit odd I grant you. However tonight I used the dehydrated courgette in our dinner and it was great. Apparently you can dehydrate cheese – which makes no sense to me, why do that to a perfectly good piece of cheese? Dehydrating gluts of fruit makes far, far more sense. You end up with sweet, chewy chunks of goodness that you can use for snacking, baking and storing for future nibbling.

So here is how I’ve done it:

Dietitian UK: Dehydrated Greengages-1

Slice the fruit and destone. With greengages and plums I like to leave them in halves, it takes longer to dehydrate but you end up with a nicer dried fruit. Anything larger you will want to slice up.

If you have a dehydrator then line then either line the trays with baking parchment or be prepared to scrub them a little after 😉

Dehydrate at 65 C for 12-24 hrs, rotate the trays a few times, when they have changed colour and have lost most of their moisture. It really depends on the size of the fruit as to how long they will take. I like popping the dehydrater on on

If you do not have a dehydrator then you can use your oven. I’ve not tried it in the oven with plums/greengages but I have done it with apples. Put your oven on it’s lowest setting and spread the sliced  fruit out baking trays lined with baking parchment. It will take several hours so be prepared to check hourly. 

Store in a kilner jar/sterile jam jar or airtight container.

Delicious, healthy snacking. 

“Mummy I’m Huuuungry”: Surviving the summer snacks with 2 under 5

Summer holidays have hit us. We’ve got 8 weeks of fun as Miss K has now “graduated” from pre-school, yes you now graduate – seriously what is that about?! So in September she starts “big-school” and I will be an emotional wreck for a moment, she is so ready to go that I really can’t be sad about it.

Most of me loves the summer holidays. I love having my kids around, it’s a great excuse to see people we can’t always meet up with, go to different places and have more relaxed times together. Tonight I spent a good 30 minutes extra just reading stories and cuddling Miss K as she didn’t need to be on a strict bedtime and I’ve no Pilates classes to teach. So. Very. Precious.

One of the things that does grate with me is the constant whine of “Mummy I’m hungry”. I cannot tell you how many times a day I hear that one. Especially after a more active than usual day. So this summer I am determined to stay on top of it with a supply of healthy snacks and crafty ideas up my sleeve. Hopefully it will keep us out of the biscuit tin. Although there are also always days you just need a biscuit.

5 Storecupboard Snacks:

1. Nuts and dried fruit. Miss K favours almonds and dried apricots. The J boy prefers walnuts and prunes. Seeing as I didn’t like those types of nuts until I was 30 (yes I am that old), I really didn’t think they would… but they do. So don’t judge what you think they will like/dislike too soon. 

Dietitian UK: Why almonds are so good for you

2. Breadsticks with cream cheese and grapes. My kids love a dip. The whole process of dipping actually keeps them quiet for a bit too!

3. Trail mix – a mixture of all the forms of dried cereal in the cupboard with some raisins. Really good on a car journey as it takes time to eat, however you may end up with cornflakes in the car seat. 

4. Peanut butter and banana on rice cakes/toast. Filling, healthy and quick. 

5. “No Junk” cereal bars with some fruit. Often my emergency snack that I keep in the change bag or pull out at home when the flapjack tin is empty (a disaster in my book, the flapjack tin must ALWAYS have flapjack in).

5 Easy Bake Healthy Treats:

1. Banana Flapjack. I’ve been making this since I was breastfeeding Miss K. It’s a staple in our house and I know many others who swear by it too.

2. Peanut Butter Cookies. Now even my husband who doesn’t like peanut butter will eat one of these. Plus the kids can make them with you.

3. Thick American style Pancakes. Make up a stack of these and freeze them. You can defrost them in the toaster or get a few out at a time ready for snack-attack. Serve with a dollop of yoghurt and fruit.

Face pancake

4. Courgette biscuits. I love these in the summer as we usually have a glut of courgettes to use up and it means the kids are eating more veggies.

5. Scones. Super quick to make and you can add fruit of veggies to them. We like broccoli scones or blackberry ones.

Dietitian UK:  Blackberry Scones

5 Freezer Snacks:

1. Ice-Lollies – I’ve invested in a pile of moulds. Personally I love the silicone ones best. However Miss K really likes the ones with the sippy spout on them too. I don’t ever get round to making these with fruit, so ours are just diluted squash. 

2. Frozen Fruit – either buy a bag of frozen fruit or freeze what you have. Frozen grapes, berries, banana chunks, pineapple, melon and plums all work well. Or coat in yoghurt and freeze for an extra treat.

Dietitian UK: Yoghurt Covered Frozen Fruit 1

3. Frozen Yoghurt. Oh my days I love a bit of frozen yoghurt. I sometimes make my own, or I completely cheat. If you pull the lid off a kids yoghurt, pop a spoon in and freeze, you can them cut off the yoghurt pot and hand them a frozen yoghurt to eat with the spoon as a stick. 

4. Frozen peas and sweetcorn. Miss K enjoys this, the J boy just thinks it’s plain crazy. I can see his point, but some kids love it. If they do, embrace it.

5. Banana Ice-cream. If you haven’t tried making 1 ingredrient banana ice-cream before then you are missing out. Go, Do, It.

I would love to hear what healthy snacks your kids love. Drop me a comment or a tweet 🙂 

Cocoa-nut Naked Balls

You know those weeks when you’ve been burning the candle at both ends, you are feeling pretty exhausted and craving something chocolately? That’s me right now so today I created these healthy, delicious balls full of raw ingredients, goodness yet with that chocolate taste too. Inspired by the Nakd bar range, I decided it couldn’t be that hard to make my own version – turns out it isn’t!

These are gluten free (if you use gluten free oats), wheat free and easy to make if you have a food processor. I ued the nuts/seeds grinder on my Kenwood Chef. Drove my kids nuts with the noise – slighly payback for the times they drive me nuts with their noise 😉 Top tip, soak the prunes first and it will make life easier. I didn’t and had to do a lot of scraping them back down the grinder pot.

Dietitian UK: Cocoa-nut naked balls

Cocoa-nut Naked Balls
Yields 5
Raw balls of goodness with a chocolate kick. These are based on Nakd bars or Lara bars. Easy to make though a little messy!
Write a review
Print
Prep Time
10 min
Prep Time
10 min
137 calories
26 g
0 g
4 g
4 g
0 g
42 g
2 g
3 g
0 g
3 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
42g
Yields
5
Amount Per Serving
Calories 137
Calories from Fat 30
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 4g
5%
Saturated Fat 0g
2%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 1g
Monounsaturated Fat 2g
Cholesterol 0mg
0%
Sodium 2mg
0%
Total Carbohydrates 26g
9%
Dietary Fiber 2g
9%
Sugars 3g
Protein 4g
Vitamin A
5%
Vitamin C
0%
Calcium
3%
Iron
8%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 75 g prunes
  2. 50g oats
  3. 25g almonds
  4. 25g raisins
  5. 1 tbsp cocoa powder
  6. 2 tbsp warm water
Instructions
  1. Soak the prunes in the warm water for 15-30 minutes depending on how much time you have.
  2. Drain the water but reserve it.
  3. Add the nuts to a food processor or nut/seed grinder and grind. Then add the oats and grind. Add the rest of the ingredients and grind. You may need to add a little of the reserved liquid to help it along but not too much as you don't want it sloppy.
  4. Now roll into balls and place onto greaseproof paper on a plate or baking tray.
  5. Place in the fridge for a couple of hours to firm up.
beta
calories
137
fat
4g
protein
4g
carbs
26g
more
Dietitian UK https://www.dietitianuk.co.uk/