Category Archives: Other

Eggs and CHolesterol

Back in the news recently has been the humble egg. At first it may sound like we’ve gone full circle on this as years ago it was advised to reduce egg consumption due to cholesterol concerns. However nutrition is never that black and white. 


The latest research was an observational study which means it shows us some possible associations but no clear cut “change a and get b” affects. 

It showed eating eggs could increase cholesterol levels. Each egg was associated with a 2.2% risk of CV disease. Sounds negative but let’s crack the egg 🍳.

Cholesterol is a nutrient that our body needs. It is used to build the structure of cell membranes. make hormones, help your metabolism work efficiently and cholesterol is essential for your body to produce vitamin D.

Consuming an additional 300 milligrams of dietary cholesterol per day was associated with a 3.2% higher risk of heart disease and a 4.4% higher risk of early death. Sounds scary in those terms but it’s all to be taken within context.

👉🏼This study was not an observational study rather than a randomised controlled trial which means it’s not gold standard evidence but there are interesting associations.

👉🏼We don’t have all the info on the diets/lifestyle of these people. It may be the eggs were being eaten in the context of a cooked breakfast or on top of a burger. Or it could be that it was an egg salad.

👉🏼The people who had the increase in cholesterol may have exercised less, been smokers or had a higher saturated fat diet. There are many variables that are not controlled for here.

👉🏼Genetics also play a role. Some people have a allele that makes them more sensitive to cholesterol. This could explain some of the studies results as well.


So should we all stop eating eggs? Hell, No. Eggs are nutritious and a good way to get protein, iron, zinc and even some vitamin D from (in some cases). Eating 3-4 eggs a week is still good advice to follow.
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The next new super-nutrient we should all be eating.

Fibre is one of the lesser talked about nutrients and yet so vitally important for our bodies. A recent summary of the scientific literature on fibre has shown just how key It is to eat a high-fibre diet. Learn more about what fibre is here.
 
The research:
 
185 studies and 58 clinical trials were reviewed, this was a total of 4635 people! So we are talking big numbers and not a one off study. This means we can put more trust in this research and it is significant.
 
So what is this compelling evidence of fibre on health?
 
The research shows us that eating at 25g to 29 g of fibre day can lead to a 15-30%  decrease in all cause death. Eaitng more fibre led to13 fewer deaths per 1000 people and 6 fewer cases of heart disease per 1000 people.
 
Overall there was a 16 to 24% reduction of heart disease, stroke, Type II diabetes, and colorectal cancer. So we’re talking about up to a quarter reduction in your risk of these diseases just by eating more fibre.
 
Eating 8 g more of fibre per day had significant reductions in the incidence of these diseases and in the number of total deaths.
 
 
What are we eating now?
When we look at what the current UK population is eating only 9% of us are meeting the fibre recommendations of 30 g a day. Average fibre intake for UK adults is 19g/day according to the National Diet and Nutrition Survey (2018).
 
So why are we not meeting the recommedations?  Is is even achievable to eat 30 g of fibre a day.
 
The advent of clean eating, low carb diets and dieting means carbohydrates have been given a bad name. However the wholegrain versions of these foods provide us with plenty of fibre.  There are other foods that provide fibre too – nuts, seeds, beans, pulses and of course fruits and veggies.
 
I think it is achievable to meet the 30g a day, here is an example day for you:
 
Porridge with berries and almonds for breakfast.
A baked potato including the skin with salad and an apple.
Baked salmon with whole-grain rice and two portions of vegetables.
A banana with yoghurt and some seeds.
 
 
Of course some people may struggle with eating a high fibre diet and with all of these things it is not a one-size fits all approach and a balance is key. For medical conditions, the general nutrition advice may need to be tailored to your needs and that is absolutely ok. So if you cannot eat a high fibre diet do not panic, just focus on eating the foods you know nourish your body. If you need help with this do seek out a registered dietitian/nutritionist who knows their stuff!
 

Book a Consultation

Priya provides one to one consultations from her home consultation rooms in Southampton or online using video calls or phone consultations. See below for the types of issues Priya can help with. Skype/Zoom video calls provide a more flexible way to see Priya face to face but from the comfort of your own home. The software for this is free to use. The majority of Priya’s work is done this way as she works with clients all over the country and internationally too. She also offers dietary analysis via email where a thorough analysis is conducted on your food diary and a report emailed back to you.

As everyone is different and needs differing levels of support Priya does not have a set way of working. However she does work from a non-diet and intuitive eating background. This is based on the concepts that diets do not lead to long term change and that it is better to focus on changing health behaviours rather than just diet and a weight focus.  Retuning your body to listen to its hunger and fullness cues, learning to respect your body and listen to its needs can be a longer route but leads to lasting changes for life.

A initial consultation lasts up to 1 hour and includes an in-depth review of your current and previous diet and food related problems plus your weight and medical history. From this information Priya will give education, advice and help you set goals that are realistic and achievable. All advice is individualised and tailor-made for you. You will receive an email summarising the agreed goals set  along with any agreed information. This may include a meal plan, worksheets or educational literature.

Follow-up sessions can be booked and last for up to 30 minutes. The number of sessions you will need will totally depend on your needs. 

Prices: £95 for an initial consultation and £65 for follow ups.

Package: £260 for 1 x initial consultation and 3 x follow up sessions.

Email dietary analysis with report £65

Eating Disorders:

Priya is renown for her expertise in this subject and the majority of her clients will have an eating disorder. She takes a holistic approach, not just looking at nutrition in isolation but helps clients to look at the wider issues too. Many of Priya’s clients have worked with the NHS and need further support or have not met the criteria for NHS input. If you do not think you have an eating disorder but know your approach to food is not as it should be, then get in touch. Working as part of a team of specialists Priya can recommend a therapist for you to work with or can liase and work with your current therapy team as well as your GP. She works with the Wings Eating Disorders Unit in Romsey and also as part of the Marchwood Priory team. If you need help getting your eating back on track Priya is here to help with education, meal planning, practical help, support and an understanding ear.

Weaning Consultations

One of Priya’s specialist and much loved areas – book a weaning consultation for advice, recipes, top tips and support to help you get your baby off to a wonderful start with food. Having weaned 3 children herself Priya has first hand experience as well as the evidence case and the research to support her advice. If you are struggling with fussy eating Priya can also help with this. Family meal planning and suppoprt can also be supported.

IBS:

Priya can help with advice and support for those with IBS, this includes the low FODMAP diet which is a specialist diet that should be followed under dietetic supervision.

Other consultations topics Priya can help with include:  Chronic Fatigue, Learning Disabilities, Family Meals,  Anaemia, Osteoporosis, brain injury and achieving a healthy balanced diet. If you have another dietary issues please do contact Priya to discuss. If Priya is not able to help she can help point you to someone who can.

Some private medical insurance companies cover dietetic consultations, please check with your insurer. Priya is registered with AXA, AVIVA, WPA, BUPA, Exeter Family, Allianz and Pru Health.

Testimonial:

“The support Priya provided to help me gain weight and overcome an eating disorder was above and beyond what I would expect from a dietician. We met regularly and she never failed to surprise me with creative and interesting ideas to introduce variety into my diet and ensure that the weight gain process was as exciting and smooth as it could be. She encouraged me to face my eating disorder head on and used her incredibly extensive and detailed knowledge on nutrition to challenge disordered thinking. Her holistic approach has been so integral to my recovery that I cannot thank her more! I’d recommend working with Priya to anyone, as her caring, enthusiastic and creative approach is something you don’t find easily.” 

Who is Priya?

Priya is a dietitian, mum of 3 and Pilates teacher with a wealth of experience. She has worked in the NHS, in private practice, with the media, writing articles, with food brands and businesses.  Qualified in 2005 she had an unusual start to her career as she couldn’t get a NHS job. As often happens this turned out to be the push into freelance work she needed. She also runs a thriving pilates studio in Southampton and has her own range of Pilates DVDs. 

So what  is she passionate about?

Breaking down the science into realistic, everyday tips, recipes and knowledge bombs that you can take away and use straight away.

Getting the right nutrition information out there. There is so much rubbish on the internet and it can be so hard to know what to believe. We need the experts giving the correct evidence.

Cooking healthy, balanced meals. Being a mum of 3 means she totally understand the trials and tribulations family life entails. Being able to throw together some simple ingredients to make a meal that is tasty and nutritious is so important. Priya cooks as much as she can from scratch, but it has to fast and easy to do.

Getting the children cooking too and teaching them about how to eat, how to listen to their bodies and how fun it is to be active too.

Teaching people to eat intuitively. Tuning back into hunger, fullness and what to eat, when. It isn’t a quick journey but it is well worth it.

Working on a 1-1 basis with those who are struggling with an eating disorder, chronic fatigue or IBS. Priya also offers advice on pregnancy nutrition, weaning and feeding your family.

If you need any help as an individual do see my consultations page or drop me an email: priya@dietitianuk.co.uk or if you are a food brand/PR/Media team see some of my other work here and do also get in touch and I’d be delighted to help.

 

Nutribox and Get Fruity. Great OTG snacks.

Snacking is one thing that keeps me going. Life can be a whirlwind of pinging from one thing to the next. An average day for me is a juggle of children, school runs, Pilates clients, dietetics clinics, paperwork and toddler mayhem. Then more Pilates classes and paperwork in the evenings… if the children actually sleep 😉  I totally love the variety but it can be like a frenzied juggling act. On the days I am failing at being a domestic goddess too I need easy to grab on the go snacks. 

So when The Nutribox sent me a healthy snack box and “Get fruity” sent over some of their bars to try as well I was over the moon.

   

The Nutribox is a fabulous idea if like me you are short of time to peruse the supermarket, health food shop and online shop shelves. Yes it come with a bigger price tag than perhaps buying things individually but what I loved was the chance to try items I had seen but not managed to get around to buying and also being exposed to new brands. I had a box of 20 gluten free items delivered to me (I’m wheat free for medical reasons). This included a range of nuts, dried fruit, bars, nut butters, olives, fruit crisps, coconut bits and fruit leather. All the snacks are low in free sugars although being fruit based many were still high in natural sugars.

Use the code: PILATESWITHPRIYA10 for 10% off a box.

I really loved this box, I can see it being a really useful gift for a new mum or helpful if you need something delivered to the office. It is also a fabulous treat to yourself when you need some new snack ideas. Who doesn’t like a parcel to unwrap?

Use code PILATESWITHPRIYA10 for 10% off.

Get Fruity bars are definitely a hit in our house and Pilates studio. Comments from some of our busy mums include:

“Really delicious and great to know it is 100% natural so I am putting healthy food into my body”

“I love the one with ginger in, perfect autumnal flavour”

Made from oats, dried fruit, fruit juices and coconut oil they are delicious and make a great item to keep handy in your bag for those  snack moments. I particularly like the mango flavour. Yes you could make these yourself, but sometime there just isn’t the time, the ingredients or the brain power to do so… having a box of these in your cupboard could be a snack saver.

Disclaimer: This is a sponsored blog post as I was sent these products to review, all views are my own.

 

Polly’s Eating Disorder Recovery Story

When I heard Polly’s eating disorder recover story I knew I had to share it. Working in the field of eating disorders can be frankly hard work. It is a long road to recovery and a battle. It takes dedication, support from others and challenging yourself at every meal time. However it is possibly and it is worth it. I hope sharing this inspires others. 

“It took 10 years for me to finally ‘come out’ and be open about my Eating Disorder. But now I’ve come to realise that in being open I can help others, never will I keep quiet again. I hope that by sharing my story I can help you, or someone you know who is struggling, and show you that recovery is possible.

Why was I silent for so long? I didn’t think anyone would think negatively of me. At age 33 all my peers are open and mature enough not to judge in such belittling ways. Perhaps it was that people wouldn’t take me seriously as a health professional – I’m a Personal Trainer & Nutritionist who helps Mums get in shape. Ironic? Not really. Because needing to lose weight or gain weight often come from the same root psychological cause. I think a lot of it was that I just wanted to forget that horrible time in my life, sweep it under the carpet. But in doing that I’m not able to help and inspire others. The can of worms had to be opened. 

They say that to develop an eating disorder you need to have the right genetics (science shows there’s a link), the right personality (typically perfectionistic and with high personal standards – me to a T), and an immediate trigger or stress at the time of developing the disorder.

I first felt fat age 8. My Dad got remarried and family life was changing. Not in a bad way, but a lot for a young child to process. I first made myself sick age 12 at boarding school. I was bullied, not for being ‘not skinny’ (I wasn’t fat), yet somehow I figured being thin was the answer. But the problem never really took off until, at age 17 at dance school (i.e. where we spent all day in a leotard being judged on how good we’d look on TV), and my then boyfriend was sent to prison. I was also living alone in London and had struggled to fit in at the college. On a subconscious level, all would be well if I lost 3 kilos. Then I would be happy. Reading this back, how silly does that sound now?

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I only ever meant to take the laxatives (half a box of them) once, just to ‘erase’ Christmas day. Each day I would swear on ‘no more Yule log’ and it was salad from now on. I never binged, but every time I ate something ‘non-diet’, I took more pills. Or vomited. Or did an extra 4 hours exercise (it was the holidays, I had time). Or all of the above. Nobody knew. I was way too ashamed to tell anyone.

It was only when this cycle started to impact my daily life about 6 weeks later – skipping classes to make myself sick, blocking up the loo in my flat, not being able to think about anything else but my fat thighs and pathetic self-will, that I switched to a new tactic – restriction. 

It started innocently enough – cutting out fat, then bread, meat……until I was probably living off about 500 calories a day of primarily vegetables, and my condition was noticed, I was removed from dance school, and put under the care of an outpatient clinic. 

And herein began six years of treatment that I resisted as much as I could. Meal plans, counselling, CBT, supervised meals, meals in tubs to take home to eat, and three times I was hospitalised at a dangerously low weight. Nothing worked. 

Why was I so resistant? To say I was miserable doesn’t cut close. If there is a Hell, I have been there. I was also diagnosed with extreme clinical depression unresponsive to medication, borderline OCD, showing bipolar ‘tendencies’ and one therapist suspected I had Borderline Personality Disorder, which some say is what Amy Winehouse had before she died. I self-harmed, and I attempted suicide twice. 

But my eating disorder kept me safe. By this time it was a way of life, it was my identity, and in some distorted way it made me feel special. This is what it comes down to in the end – I never felt special. I felt like a worthless waste of space, yet ironically struggling with this eating disorder only reinforced how much of a waste I was. After all I was putting my family through so much stress and worry. None of it makes sense, but I guess that’s why mental illnesses are so hard to recover from.

So how is it that I can be here today, happier than I have even been in my life, married with two children, and helping other women learn how to treat their body well?

I often get asked what made me finally recover. Honestly? I don’t know. I remember being in a pub garden one summer with a couple of friends, fresh out of another hospital admission and going downhill already. One companion announced she was getting married, the other that she was pregnant. Suddenly for the first time since I developed anorexia, I felt lonely. The eating disorder had been my only friend who stuck by me, yet this ‘friend’ was turning against me. Everyone was growing up, creating careers, moving on with their life. I was stuck in this child like state, being left behind. If there’s one dream I had all my life even throughout the illness, it was to have children. A little girl I could bring up as my little princess. That was not going to happen if I carried on. I was at that time infertile and no man in their right mind would be attracted to an emaciated mess. 

It was like I woke up, or a lightbulb went off, or something switched in my brain. I didn’t want this illness in my life anymore. This time I really didn’t want it.

That’s not to say it came easy. Anorexia is like having a little devil on your shoulder, dictating what you should and should not eat, telling you how pathetic you are if you give in and eat. I’m not going to lie – those voices are still there every day, even 10 years on. But there’s a difference. Now, I shout back louder. 

It’s a fight, every day. I know people who seem to have completely recovered and they think the same way about food and their body as any ‘normal’ person. I may get to that place, I may not. But I’m happy, I’m healthy, and I will keep on winning this fight. 

I’m not a counsellor or psychologist, but I have been there, I do understand. So if anyone wanted to reach out and chat, ask advice, or hopefully to tell me they’ve been inspired to keep fighting, I’m only an email or social media contact away. If I can help just one person, that can of worms was definitely worth opening. ”

 

Pollyanna Hale helps Mums lose weight and get their body confidence back via online coaching with www.thefitmumformula.com/. A qualified Personal Trainer, Polly knows from personal experience and though helping hundreds of women that there is more to having a healthy body than just following some cookie cutter meal plan. Long term success comes from learning to love yourself and your body and treating it with the respect it deserves. It doesn’t matter if you’re overweight or underweight, or somewhere in between. The weight is just a symptom. Everyone deserves to feel special. 

 

Nominated for “The Drinks Cellar Food & Drink Blogger Awards 2016”

It is always nice to open up your emails and find you have been nominated for an award! I’m delighted to be on the shortlist for the Drinks cellar food and drink blogger awards 2016. 

Over the last month, online retailer The Drinks Cellar and world-renowned winemakers Luc Belaire have been on a relentless search to find the best food and drink blogs on the web. They have seen fit to include Dietitian UK in their list!

From July 4th you will be able to vote for me, so I will be asking for your support. Prizes include Luc Belaire French sparkling wine, so if you are local I may be able to invite you to a party 😉

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Priya, Finalist for Influential Woman of the Year 2016

Women in business. Alway something I like to support, shout about and get behind. This time I’m the one in the limelight. This week I found out I am one of 3 finalists for the Southampton Venus Awards “Influential Women of the Year Award” 2016.

Priya Tew 2016 Venus Awards Finalist

 

Pretty amazing huh. Well I was shocked anyway.

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I had an interview with the sponsors of the category a few weeks ago and I can honestly say it was a delight. The people from Peter Cooper Motor Group who chatted to me seemed genuinely interested in our businesses and also in the person (me) behind it all. I came away quite uplifted.

Almost as amazing was the fact I found out at a posh afternoon tea event at Botleigh Grange Hotel and they provided me with a decent wheat free version. I’ll be honest I was expected not to be able to eat anything…  but then there arrived a platter of goodies just for me, that’s the way to a pregnant girls heart.

I love the fact we have local Awards that celebrate Women in Business. It can be a lonely place to be, so these awards are a chance to celebrate what people do, to meet and network and to have a glam night out too. Now someone just needs to find a dress to fit me at 35 weeks pregnant! 

The big Awards Ceremony is on Friday 15th April. 

I will be the one with the large bump, holding the baby in. Come say Hi 🙂

The Venus Awards were set up in Dorset in 2009 by Tara Howard to recognise the hard work, effort and skill it takes women to successfully juggle business with other commitments. The Awards have since been expanded to Southampton, Brighton, Devon, Oxford, Portsmouth, Birmingham, Isle of Wight and Bristol. Distributed on behalf of Venus Awards – www.venusawards.co.uk

 

Why dietitians need to be on Social Media.

This week I gave a talk on social media to a group of dietitians as part of the South East Branch Meeting of the British Dietetic Association. Rather nerve wracking but they were a lovely crowd and it went down really well 🙂 

Here is a photo someone took of me and posted on Instagram. Thankyou to Tash Guildford (@NGuildford82 on Instagram).

Thanks to Tash Guildford for the photo (@NGuildford82 on Instagram).
Thanks to Tash Guildford for the photo (@NGuildford82 on Instagram).

What it really highlighted to me was the lack of expertise we have in the profession in this area. Which is understandable as it’s not exactly what we were trained in! However in this world of technology when everyone has a smart phone and listens to the info on the internet we need to be have a presence. A good presence. A loud presence. A big presence. 

If as dietitians and trained nutritionists we think we are the people that the public should be seeking out for their nutritional knowledge then we need to be visible and easy to find. Otherwise there are plenty of others out there giving nutrition advice. Not all good, evidenced based, sensible advice either. 

Top tips:
1. Find a platform you like best. Set up an account and watch what others post/do. I like twitter the best. I get business through Twitter, I learn through it, I network with other professionals on it. That’s just my preference however.
2. Follow other nutrition professionals and follow who they follow! Start asking questions and interacting. 
3. Post interesting content. Things your patients ask you. Research papers you have read. Websites you like. Good fact sheets. 
4. Share other people’s good content. It makes them feel that what they are doing is worthwhile and it stops you reinventing the wheel. 
5. Find out your departments social media policy and look at starting a department account that several people can post and run. 
6. Don’t get drawn into arguments. It is quite easy to do! Either step back and ignore those types of comments or take it off line. 
7. If you are unsure about anything then ask! There are lots of more experienced dietitians on social media who will help. I chatted to some of the U.S. Dietitians in the early days to get tips on how they do
things and they were delighted to help me. 
8. Join in Twitter chats and network with others. Don’t sit there silently, just watching. Come and “join the conversation” (twitters tag line).
9. Be yourself. I share some personal info on my social media. It helps people see a bit about who I am and how I work. But don’t over share and be careful what you share. In our house we have some rules about what we post about the children for example.
10. Check out the BDA and HCPC’s social media policy and your local departments too. 

If you aren’t following me on social media then go and do it!! Then get chatting to me 🙂 

Beetroot, Courgette and Cheddar Pesto Pinwheels.

I love a bargain and I love using up leftovers. This recipes combines both! Using some puff pastry I found reduced to 16p and the veggies that were in need of being eaten quick. This was a bit of a gamble as I haven’t cooked a whole heap with beetroot but the sweetness of the beetroot really works and it gives these a beautiful colour.

Beetroot is packed with the phytonutrients: Betalain, a good antioxidant, this gives them their red colour.  They also contain a good amount of folate, manganese and potassium plus provide fibre. 

Although puff pastry isn’t something I would recommend people eat everyday, this recipe is packed with veggies and makes a good alternative for lunches. 

 

Dietitian UK: Beetroot, courgette and cheddar pesto  pinwheels

Beetroot, courgette and cheddar pesto pinwheels.
Yields 10
Quick to make, easy for luncboxes.
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Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
20 min
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
20 min
55 calories
2 g
8 g
4 g
3 g
2 g
47 g
65 g
2 g
0 g
2 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
47g
Yields
10
Amount Per Serving
Calories 55
Calories from Fat 36
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 4g
6%
Saturated Fat 2g
9%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0g
Monounsaturated Fat 2g
Cholesterol 8mg
3%
Sodium 65mg
3%
Total Carbohydrates 2g
1%
Dietary Fiber 1g
3%
Sugars 2g
Protein 3g
Vitamin A
3%
Vitamin C
7%
Calcium
6%
Iron
2%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 1 roll of prebought puff pastry
  2. 1 tbsp tomato puree
  3. 1 tbsp pesto
  4. 2 grated beetroot
  5. 1 medium grated courgette
  6. 80g grated cheddar
Instructions
  1. Let the puff pastry defrost enough to be unrolled.
  2. Spread on the tomato puree and pesto, mixing them together as you spread.
  3. Grated over the beetroot and courgette making sure the whole sheet of pastry is covered.
  4. Grate the cheese on top. Just a thin layer is fine.
  5. Roll up.
  6. Slice into 10-12 pieces and place on a lined baking tray.
  7. Bake at Gas Mark 7 for 20 minutes,
beta
calories
55
fat
4g
protein
3g
carbs
2g
more
Dietitian UK https://www.dietitianuk.co.uk/