Tag Archives: UK

Gluten free carrot cake, a healthy version.

I must admit I don’t have that much of a sweet tooth. It’s savoury things that get my tastebuds tingling. However with a glut of carrots eyeing me up from the vegetable rack and a frustrating day, I decided it was time to hit the kitchen and get my “bake on”. Cooking for me is one of my ways of relaxing.

I’ve never made a gluten free carrot cake, so this was a test of my brain cells, pulling apart a few other recipes and adapting things to make a healthier version. I’m all for cake, but I’m not into too much sugar or fat and prefer a moist, light texture. So I went for plenty of carrots and mixed up my flours for texture.

The result was suprisingly good (I really should expect more of my baking and not be so suprised). It’s light, it’s cakey, its moist, it cuts well, it holds together well, it’s tasty and it looks good, I really like the colour. You know what? I think I may be getting the hang of this 😉

If you like your cakes with icing and more sweetness then feel free to knock up a cream cheese frosting to go on this, I didn’t as that’s not my bag.

Recipe:


150g ground almonds

350 cornmeal

150g sugar

4 eggs

500g grated carrots

80ml rapeseed oil

1 tsp vanilla extract

1 tsp baking powder

1 tsp cinnamon

1 tsp mixed spice

  • Mix the ground almonds, cormeal and sugar together. Then beat in the eggs and oil.
Dietitian UK: Gluten Free Carrot Cake Mix
Dietitian UK: Gluten Free Carrot Cake Prepped
  • Add the grated carrot and mix.  I then put this in my food processor so the carrot was broked down further.
Dietitian UK: Gluten Free Carrot Cake Mix
Dietitian UK: Gluten Free Carrot Cake Mix
  • Add the vanilla extract, baking powder, cinnamon and mixed spice.
  • Pour into a well greased and lined cake tin.
  • Bake at Gas Mark 4 for 50-60 minutes.
  • Enjoy with a cup of tea!
Dietitian UK: Gluten Free Carrot Cake
Dietitian UK: Gluten Free Carrot Cake

Next time I’d add some raisin into this and perhaps some chopped nuts.

 

Roasted Beetroot Pasta, It’s Pink!

This weekend we went to the farmers market and I just couldn’t help but buy a bunch of large, large beetroot. They have sat looking at me from the veg rack for a few days and today I knew I needed to use them. But how?

I knew roasting them would be ideal because of their size and roasting veggies always draws out their sweetness, so I washed them, cut the leaves off and put them in the oven to roast at Gas Mark 6. This gave me 45 minutes or so to plan what to do next!

It’s Friday so in our house that’s quick meal night as I have feed toddler, feed myself and  get toddler to bed all before 7pm. So I went for pasta and was mighty pleased with the result, a bit on the pink side but delicious and packed full of veg. Beetroot contain folate, manganese, vitamin C, fibre and potassium amongst other nutrition. The red colour is due to Betacyanins, a phytonutrient and antioxidant. Roasting for more than 1 hour or boiling for too long can lead to this antioxidant being damaged so keep the cooking time down.

Recipe (serves 2 plus toddler):

(gluten free, wheat free, low fat, weaning food)

  • 4 large beetoots
  • 1 tbsp rapseed oil
  • pasta (can be gluten free)
  • 2 tbsp low fat creme fraiche
  • 2 tbsp quark
  • pepper

 

  • Wash the beetroot and cut the leaves off, but do not peel. Place in a roasting tray and drizzle with 1 tbsp oil, roast for 45 minutes at Gas Mark 6.
  • When the beetroot feel soft  (you can stab them with a knife to check), remove and peel them. I did this under the cold tap as I was in a rush and had no time to let them cool. The skin will come off easily.
  • Chop the beetroot into bite size chunks and put into a non stick pan on a medium heat. Add the creme fraiche and quark and let is cook gently for 10 minutes.
Dietitian UK: Beetroot mixture cooks in the pan
Dietitian UK: Beetroot mixture cooks in the pan
  •  Meanwhile cook the pasta.
  • Season to taste then mix the beetroot into the pasta and serve.
Dietitian UK: Roasted Beetroot Pasta
Dietitian UK: Roasted Beetroot Pasta

It’s pink, it’s pretty and it’s packed with goodness. Go try it out!

 

Do you think you have an Eating Disorder?

Are you worried you may have an eating disorder or do you have a loved one you are worried about? Read on for signs and advice on what to do next.

Eating disorders are characterised by an abnormal attitude towards food that causes someone to change their eating habits and behaviour.

They can affect all types of people at all stages of life and are more common than you think with 1 in 250 women and 1 in 2,000 men suffering from anorexia nervosa. Bulimia is 5 times more common than anorexia and 90% of sufferers are female. Binge eating usually occurs later in life affecting both men and women.

Eating disorders often occur out of the need for a person to feel in control of life or as a reaction to stress or a bad experience in life. They can be a way of coping with feelings that are making you unhappy or depressed. It may be difficult to face up to and talk about, feelings like anger, sadness, guilt, loss or fear.

Common Signs:

  •  Severe weight loss
  • Periods stopping
  • Feeling disastified with your weight and body shape
  • Having a fear of gaining weight
  • Becoming obsessed with calories adn what you eat
  • Thinking about food all the time
  • Feeling guilty after eating
  • Excessive exercising
  • Being sick after eating
  • being secretive about food and not wanting to eat with others.
  • Feeling out of control and eating large amounts of food in one go

If you feel you or a loved one may have an eating disorder the best place to go to get help is your GP, they can signpost you to your local eating disorder services and give you initial advice and support. It can be hard to admit you have a problem, but think about how much better life would be if you didn’t have to worry about your eating.

If you have a close friend you trust maybe try talking to them about how you feel, talking about it can be very therapeutic. Recovery is a step by step process that takes time and usually involves psychological help as well as input from a specialist dietitian with experience in eating disorders.

The Beat website www.b-eat.co.uk is also a great place to get good information.

This post is take from http://www.slimsticks.com/priya-tew-do-you-think-you-have-an-eating-disorder

Emotional Eating

Many people turn to food for comfort, consciously or unconsciously. For example when they’re facing a difficult problem or feeling low. Eating can be a way to suppress or soothe emotions, such as stress, anxiety, boredom, sadness and loneliness.

Some higher calorie, fatty and sugary foods have seemingly addictive qualities. After eating chocolate your body releases endorphins, giving you a natural high, boosting your mood.

Food can also be a distraction. If you’re worried or anxious, eating comfort foods makes your thoughts focus on the pleasant taste. Unfortunately, afterwards the anxiety returns plus the additional guilt about overeating.

Although emotional eating can make you feel better, it’s a temporary fix and leads to eating too many high-calorie foods. The good news is you can take steps to regain control of your eating habits.

  • Are you really hungry? If you ate recently and don’t have a rumbling stomach, you’re probably not. Try a glass of water instead.
  • Know your triggers. Keep a food and thought diary looking at how you feel when you eat. Look for patterns that reveal negative eating patterns and triggers. For example do you eat more after a bad day at work?
  • Try distraction techniques – Take a walk, watch your favourite film, listen to music, have a warm bath, read or call a friend.
  • Limit your comfort foods, out of sight, out of mind! Keep a selection of healthier snacks around such fresh fruit, low fat yoghurt or plain popcorn
  • Eat a balanced diet, with regular meals. If you’re not eating enough you are more likely to give in to emotional eating.
  • Exercise regularly and get adequate rest. Your mood is more manageable and your body can more effectively fight stress when it’s fit and well rested.

If you slip up, forgive yourself and start fresh the next day. Try to learn from the experience, and make a plan for how you can prevent it in the future.

This post is quoted from http://www.slimsticks.com/priya-tew-emotional-eating please click for more information.

Ryvita Thins GIVEAWAY.

I love to try new products. Walking round the supermarket picking up, having a browse, reading labels and backs of packets, it’s all part of the fun of being a dietitian….I admit it, I do LOVE MY JOB! However this time I have a problem. The lovely people at Ryvita have send me 3 packs of their Ryvita thins to try, extremely nice of them….however they contain wheat. So it’s over to you instead…A GIVEAWAY 🙂

 

Ryvita Thins

These are wheat and rye flatbreads and come in various flavours. At only 29kcals and 0.6g fat per slice they could make a perfect snack, I’m imaging them with some on my homemade hummous or some low fat soft cheese alongside some slices of cucumber and peppers. Yum. I’m guessing they could be a little too yummy and that portion control is going to be key here as eating the whole pack would mean you end up eating over 500kcals and 12g fat.

 

I have 3 packs of these to giveaway, if you win I’d love your feedback.

To win:

OR

 

  • Follow me on Twitter (@DietitianUK) and Tweet “I’ve entered the DietitianUK Ryvita giveaway”

OR

  • Comment on this post

OR

  • Do multiple entries by doing all 3!

Winners will be drawn by random on Mon 27th Feb.

Disclaimer: I am not being paid for this blog, Ryvita kindly sent me some products to giveaway to my readers. I am not aiming to promote or endorse this product over any other, there are many other brands of crackers out there too. This giveaway only applies to UK mainland.

Slim Down, Sense Up for 2012

Slim Down, Sense Up for 2012.

Do you need to lose some weight to improve your long term health? Made a New Years Resolution to get into shape? Have you cycled through numerous diets and not had much success, or put back on all the weight you lost a few months later? Do you struggle with comfort eating? Priya can help.

Dietitian UK has a special offer on in 2012, specifically designed to help you Slim Down and Sense Up – slimming down those bodies and building up your nutrition sense. This offer can carried out by Skype or in person.

 This package includes:

3 x 45 minute one to one weight management sessions with Priya – registered dietitian and fitness instructor

Email support between sessions with tips, recipe advice and meal planning help as well as   motivation and positivity to boost you on your way.

Each session will include invaluable advice on eating, cooking, recipes, meal planning and exercise. Some behavioural therapy techniques will be used to help you change your habits. There will the opportunity for a weigh-in, for body fat analysis and waist measures.

Let Priya help you become healthier and happier in 2012.

Vitamin D, do you get enough?

Vitamin D is one of those nutrients that we often forget about yet is very important. Suddenly, it’s having a come back and becoming a hot topic.

So what’s the fuss about?

Hands up if you know what vitamin D is even needed for? Those of you who said bone health get a gold star. Vitamin D helps your body absorb calcium, specifically your gut. It helps you maintain the levels of calcium and phosphate in the body so that you have enough for bone mineralisation and bone growth. It also plays a role in cell growth, immune function and reducing inflammation in the body.

Too little vitamin D affects your bones, they can become thin and brittle. Rickets in children and osteomalacia/osteoporosis in adults are due to too low vitamin D levels. Worryingly rickets is on the rise in the UK, as is osteoporosis. So we really need to be thinking about looking after our bones.

Children 1-7 months need 8.5μg/d and those aged 7months-3 years 7μg/d, pregnant and breastfeeding women 10μg/d. There are no set levels for those 3-64 years.

Most people know we make vitamin D when we step into the sunshine, however there are numerous issues with this. To get enough of the right type of sun’s rays all year round you need to live in the right area of the world. In the UK we unsuprisingly don’t fall into that category. Having pale skin means you accrue vitamin D 10 times faster than darker skinned people, but we are now out in the sun less and less, plus when we are out there is usually sun cream on the skin preventing the UVB rays getting through and so stopping vitamin D being made. Somewhere we need a balance.

After World War II the NHS was born (1947) and vitamin drops were given to all children under 5 for free, these included vitamin D. This is not standard practice now and many little ones are not getting enough of the D love in their life. In fact my little one wasn’t until recently.

But what about vitamin D in foods I hear you all cry…well that’s the main problem, it’s not found in that many foods. Here’s a few – oily fish, some canned fish, shitake mushrooms, eggs and fortified cereals and margarine. In America milk, orange juice and cheese is all fortified too. There’s a debate over whether more foods in the UK should be fortified at the moment. What do you think? Do you give your little ones a supplement?