Tag Archives: sugar

The misconception of sugar.

By Rosie Jasper, student dietitian.

Many thanks to Rosie for this blog post. Carbs are a huge topic that I myth bust on and talk to clients about every week… so I know you will find this helpful.

 I don’t know about you but I’m sick and tired of seeing celebrities, Instagram influencers and articles in the media encouraging us to cut out key components of our diets, for example carbohydrates!
Apparently cutting out sugar and therefore carbohydrate sources is the key to losing weight according to some top celebrity influencers such as Jennifer Lopez, who was promoting a 10 day no sugar, no carbohydrate challenge!

Sugars are carbohydrates; when we consume foods containing carbohydrates (such as those previously mentioned), our bodies break these down into simple sugars called glucose. Glucose is an essential part of our diet as it provides our body, including our brain with the energy it requires to function on a daily basis.

Carbohydrate containing foods also contain essential vitamins and minerals that are required to keep our bodies working as effectively as it should; a lack of nutrients could cause lead to a decrease in energy, mood and brain function. A decrease in mood may mean that we’re more likely to opt for ‘comfort foods’, that are often high in fat, salt and refined sugar, which defeats the object of the aimed weight loss and the vicious cycle begins. Therefore, by cutting out all carbohydrates in the diet, it’s subsequently removing important nutrients our bodies need.

As suggested by the Eatwell Guide, a third of the food we consume should be starchy foods and carbohydrates should form 50% of our energy intake daily. It is recommended that when choosing starchy foods, we should opt for wholegrain varieties where possible instead of their white/refined varieties. 

Examples of wholegrains:

  • Wholegrain bread
  • Wholegrain pasta 
  • Brown rice 
  • Quinoa 
  • Bulgur 
  • Wheat based cereals e.g. – Wheat biscuits, Bran Flakes, muesli (opt for the no added sugar or salt variety) 

White/refined products have been processed and includes foods like white bread, white pasta and white rice. During processing many of their nutrients including B vitamins, vitamin E, fibre and minerals are removed; however, we need all of these nutrients as they provide many health benefits such as providing energy, having antioxidant effects, keeping our digestive system healthy and for maintenance of bone, teeth, nerves, hair etc. Wholegrain carbohydrates include the whole grain and therefore maintain its nutrients. 

Carbohydrates do not naturally lead to weight gain if eaten in moderation, however it is true that eating carbohydrates excessively can lead to an increase in weight. Carbohydrates have many important roles in the body and shouldn’t be avoided due to the fear of weight gain.

The important role of carbohydrates in the body:

  • Our main source of energy – starchy foods are broken down more slowly than free sugar products and therefore provides us with a steady release of energy during the day 
  • Brain function – the brain requires a steady glucose supply in order to function properly 
  • Wholegrain starchy products contain B vitamins, vitamin E, fibre and minerals 
  • Fruits and vegetables contain naturally occurring sugar and are packed with essential vitamins and minerals to help keep our bodies healthy 
  • Fibre is a type of carbohydrate and helps to keep our digestive system healthy, reduce likelihood of constipation, reduce cholesterol and a diet high in fibre has also been associated with a lower risk of bowel cancer 
  • A diet low in carbohydrates is associated with low energy levels, a decreased brain function and low mood 

It is recommended that we aim for 5 portions of starchy foods per day (260g).  To put it in to perspective this is what 1 portion of a starchy carbohydrate looks like. An easy portion guide is for your cooked carb to fill your cupped hand. There is no need to weigh foods out each time you cook then, just weigh it once and find something it fits in like a tea cup to use as a household measure.

  1. 50 dry oats/ ½ cup
  2. 2 wheat biscuits 
  3. 1 slice of bread
  4. 1 bagel 
  5. 1 naan bread
  6. 100g dry cous cous/ ¾ cup/approximately 2 hands full
  7. 75g dry pasta/ ¾ cup/approximately 2 hands full
  8. 75g spaghetti (when bunched together should be the same width as a £1 coin)

The portions of pasta, cous cous and oats may look small when uncooked but when water is added to them and they are cooked, they increase in size and weight. Then when vegetables and/or lean meat is added the portions will bulk out more to create a balanced dish. Meals should be based around starchy foods and adding extra ingredients will contribute to a healthy, balanced diet and increase the nutrient content. 

Fibre is also a type of carbohydrate that is found in plant-based foods, however it’s not absorbed or digested and therefore doesn’t impact our blood sugar levels, so doesn’t need to be classed as part of your daily CHO. 

Benefits of fibre:

  • Promote regular bowel movements 
  • Prevents constipation 
  • Helps to control blood glucose levels 
  • Reduces cholesterol 

Wholegrain varieties of starchy foods, fruit and vegetables especially when eaten with their skin on, e.g. – potatoes, apples and pears are all excellent sources of fibre. 

Meal ideas including their carbohydrate and fibre content

Meal Carbohydrate content (g) Fibre content (g)
50g oats made and water 80g berries 37 6
2 wheat biscuits 135ml semi skimmed milk  Sliced banana 53 5
Wholegrain bagel Low fat spread Salmon Cottage cheese  42 7
2 slices of wholegrain toast  Low fat spread  Peanut butter  31 7
75g dried pasta ½ tin of chopped tomatoes 80g peas 80g broccoli 20g spinach  64 16
Medium sized jacket potato  ½ tin of baked beans  30g cheddar cheese 63 15

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Endorsement of faddy diets in the media should be taken with a pinch of salt (or sugar in this case!), remember a lot of these people have personal dietitians, chefs, personal trainers, photoshop and surgery to achieve their ‘dream bodies’ that you see online. Removing main food groups, even for a short period of time is not healthy or sustainable and shouldn’t be encouraged.

Priya speaks out on the sugar in children’s drinks on Wave 105 radio

A Southampton dietitian has told Wave 105 how many parents are unaware of just how much sugar is in supposedly “healthy” fruit drinks for children.

Dietitian UK: Top 3 myths about sugar

Priya Tew is offering mums and dads advice on healthy alternatives to make sure their children are not exceeding their recommend daily intake (RDA) of sugar.

It comes as a new study shows many fruit drinks for children are “unacceptably high” in sugar.

The research, published in the journal BMJ Open 24th March 2016, found that 42% of fruit juices, juice drinks and smoothies surveyed contained at least 19g of sugars, 5 tsp, this is almost a child’s entire maximum recommended intake per day.

Action on Sugar is asking for a reformulation programme to reduce sugar in children’s drinks by 50% in 5 years and restrict them to 150ml serving sizes. Only 6 products surveyed were found in 150ml servings, meaning children are likely to be consuming more.

“The research doesn’t surprise me. Although it [fruit juice] is high is natural sugar, it’s a very accessible form of sugar.

“I do think parents are unaware of how much added sugar there is in fruit juice and smoothies, and they’re seen as a healthy option. I would beg to differ on that. I think a healthy option for a drink for a child is water or milk, perhaps some no added sugar squash.

“If you’re going to give your child fruit juice then my advice would be to water it down, make it half juice and half water, and only have that as an occassional treat rather than a daily option.”

When processed into fruit juice drinks, the sugars (fructose) in the fruit cell walls are released as ‘free sugars’ which damage your teeth and provide unnecessary calories; you take in more calories without feeling full (i.e. A 200ml glass of orange juice can contain 3 oranges).  

Co-author of the study Kawther Hashem, Registered Nutritionist and Researcher of Action on Sugar says: “It is highly concerning that many parents are still buying fruit juices and juice drinks for their children thinking they are choosing healthy products; children should be given as little juice as possible (maximum of 150ml/day).These juices rot children’s teeth and give children a ‘sweet tooth’ that will affect their general health in later life. 

“What is more concerning are the products with added sugar and glucose-fructose syrup. We call on all manufacturers to stop adding more sugars to already sweet juices, particularly in children’s products and to restrict children’s drinks to only 150ml bottles/cartons.

“Our advice is to eat the fruit, don’t drink the juice.  Juice should be an occasional treat, not an ‘everyday’ drink. These processed drinks are laden with sugars and calories and do not have the same nutritional benefits of fresh fruit and vegetables.” 

 

Nutrition gone crazy?

Sugar. Saturated fat. Salt.

Dietitian UK: Sugar.Salt.SatFat

 

 

Eye catching nutrients that have been in the media spotlight recently. All of which has caused great confusion for pretty much everyone. 

I completely agree that people need to be educated about nutrition. Science needs to be shared. However what I’ve seen is a media frenzy and the wrong messages being shouted out, whilst the key message are swallowed up. 

It very much feels like we have started focusing more on single nutrients instead of looking at our diets and lifestyles as a whole. It doesn’t add up to me. If we focus on reducing sugar then will this lead to not eating yoghurt and calcium levels dropping? Personally I do not sit down and add up how much sugar I have in a day. At least not on a regular basis. What I do look at is the balance of my diet. How many portions of fruit and veggies I eat, oily fish, whole grains, high fibre foods. Then I focus on eating whole unprocessed foods when possible and cooking from scratch. I drink water, tea with no sugar or herbal tea. Sugary snack foods are a treat food. For me it works.

I have clients who have spreadsheets detailing all their nutritional intake for the day. Pretty time consuming and confusing as when you try to make one nutrient balance the books another one slips up. 

I’m not sure there is a perfect diet. I think it’s all about choosing sensible, achievable goals and working towards a sustainable healthier lifestyle. Small changes you can stick to. 

Such as :
Eat another 2 portions of veggies a day. 
Step away from the cereal bars and back to the fruit bowl with some nuts and seeds.
Swap sugary soft drinks for a sugar free version, homemade fruit water, herbal tea or no added sugar squash. 
Build activity into your day, everyday. 

Rant over. 
What are you doing to make achievable steps toward a healthier lifestyle? 

How to cut down on sugar

Ok so first things first. Sugar is NOT the enemy. (Runs and ducks under cover). Seeing any single nutrient or food as the baddie However I completely agree that eating less sugar is something to be encouraged for MOST people. Notice I didn’t say ALL people. For some who are focusing on weight gain eating food that contain sugar can be useful and necessary. 

Dietitian UK: Top 3 myths about sugar

The new WHO guidelines are that we shouldn’t be eating more than 10% of our total energy intake as free or added sugars. These are sugars that are added to foods as well as sugars naturally found in honey, fruit juices, fruit concentrates and syrups. So it does not include the sugar naturally found in foods such as fruit, vegetables, milk and some yoghurts for example. 

Why do we need to reduce the sugar? The research shows a link between sugar and obesity. This makes total sense. Too many calories = weight gain. Sugar = calories. This is  not saying that sugar is the main or only cuplrit in the obesity crisis, it is one of them. Sugar is also linked to dental caries. Again, it’s a widely known fact and yet we still eat it.

Personally I don’t jump on the band wagon of “sugar cleanses” or completely cutting out sugar. I wouldn’t find that sustainable. What I promote is reducing your sugar intake alongside finding a healthy lifestyle that is sustainable in the long term. If your meals taste horrible you won’t stick to it. Cooking from scratch, steering away from jars of sauce, snacking on fruit and veggies, switching to a sweetener, altering how you bake and drinking unsweetened beverages are all things I’m in favour of. 

Cut down on:

Adding sugar to drinks and cereals/food.

Using honey.

Fruit juices and soft drinks.

Jars of sauce and condiments such as tomato sauce – look at the labels and see how much sugar is added!

Ready meals, soups and desserts. 

Cereal bars, biscuits, cakes, sweets and processed foods.

Sugary breakfast cereals.

 

Instead :

Check the labels of foods and look for a lower sugar option. 

Get creative in the kitchen and bake up some low sugar treats. You can use fruit to sweeten baking in cakes and flapjacks and make main meals such as lasagne without any need for sugary sauces.

Switch to a sweetener. Many now come from natural sources and can be used in baking.

Wean yourself off sugary foods. If you have sugar in your drinks try gradually adding less over time. Go from 2 tsp, to 1 tsp to 1/2 tsp to 0 tsp for example.

Choose a wholegrain, low sugar cereal and add some fruit to bring in the sweetness.

Make your own versions of sauces, they are not only lower in sugar but usually cheaper too.

Try not to have sugary foods to hand or you are more likely to eat them!

Allow yourself to have sweet treats on occasion, it is impractical to cut things out entirely. Even dietitians eat cake and chocolate 😉

 

 

Weight Loss, Healthy Meals, Fizzy Drinks, Sugar and Getting Active: Priya on BBC Radio Solent

January is the time everyone makes New Years Resolutions. A lot of those are centered around weight loss and being healthier. So I was delighted to go into BBC Radio Solent office and chat about these very topics.

Dietitian UK: At the BBC Southampton Studios
Dietitian UK: At the BBC Southampton Studios

I love chatting about food, giving out top tips and so talking on the radio is perfect for me! I’m fortunate to also have a lovely local radio station who invite me in from time to time and I must admit I find it all an easy, enjoyable experience 😉 Today’s interview was with the lovely Alina Jenkins, here’s her view in the recording studio:

Dietitian UK: BBC Radio Solent Recording Studio
Inside the Studio

Take a listen to my top tips below: Priya talks on BBC Radio Solent, Alina Jenkins Show Enjoy! What would your top tips be to share on radio?

 

Oh! If you want the Lentil Bolognaise Recipe here it is.