Tag Archives: dietitian southampton

Healthy, Low Fat, Low sugar Cranberry Muffins (GF/WF)

You know when you look in the fridge and see something staring at you saying “Use me up quick”? Yes my fridge talks to me 😉 Well I’ve had a punnet of cranberries staring at me for a little while and suddenly I knew I had to use them or lose them. Hubby often does the fruit and veg shopping which is fabulous but means I am never too sure what I will get. Last week he picked up fresh cranberries. Very seasonal but seeing as we didn’t need cranberry sauce what  was I going to do with them?

Cake was the answer. Sometimes in life cake is needed. These beauties worked so well they surprised me, I’m now going to have to adapt the recipe for other fruit so I can make them again.

Dietitian UK: Healthy Cranberry Muffins

Healthy Cranberry Muffins (gluten and wheat free)
Serves 12
Gluten free, wheat free muffins that are moist and soft. The oats give them some whole grains, the fruit reduces the sugar needed and the yoghurt replaces the butter - giving these a healthier outlook.
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Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
20 min
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
20 min
110 calories
23 g
16 g
1 g
3 g
0 g
41 g
60 g
6 g
0 g
0 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
41g
Servings
12
Amount Per Serving
Calories 110
Calories from Fat 10
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 1g
2%
Saturated Fat 0g
1%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0g
Monounsaturated Fat 0g
Cholesterol 16mg
5%
Sodium 60mg
3%
Total Carbohydrates 23g
8%
Dietary Fiber 2g
7%
Sugars 6g
Protein 3g
Vitamin A
1%
Vitamin C
2%
Calcium
3%
Iron
4%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 1/2 cup rice flour
  2. 1/2 cup cornmeal
  3. 1/2 cup oats
  4. 4 tsp sugar/sweetener
  5. 1 tsp cinnamon
  6. 1/2 cup raisins
  7. 1/2 cup fresh cranberries
  8. 1 tsp baking powder
  9. 1/2 tsp bicarbonate of soda
  10. 1/2 mashed banana
  11. 1 egg
  12. 1 cup natural yoghurt
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to Gas Mark 5
  2. Mix the flours, oats, sugar, cinnamon, baking powder and bicarbonate of soda together.
  3. Now add the raisins and cranberries.
  4. Mix the egg and yoghurt together seperately with the mashed banana and then add to the mixture.
  5. Spoon into muffin cases and bake for 20 minutes.
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calories
110
fat
1g
protein
3g
carbs
23g
more
Dietitian UK https://www.dietitianuk.co.uk/

Salmon and Vegetable Bake

I love fish but I sometimes struggle to get it into our weekly menu as hubby isn’t that keen on it. Anything with bones, a head or tails is definitely not allowed on the table (prawns excepted) and anything too fishy is also a no go.

So here is my latest fishy offering and this one went down well. The hubby said I could make it again and gave a few mmmmm noises. The toddler gave me a clap and said “Well done Mummy”, high praise indeed 🙂 

So why not give it a go and see how it fares with your family? Salmon is an oily fish providing omega 3’s and the vegetables will pack this meal up to provide 2 of your 5 a day. 

This meal can be prepared in advance then put in the oven to cook through later on.

 

Salmon and Vegetable Bake
Serves 3
A different way to serve up oily fish and veggies to your family.
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Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
45 min
Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
45 min
423 calories
35 g
83 g
14 g
41 g
5 g
425 g
601 g
9 g
0 g
5 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
425g
Servings
3
Amount Per Serving
Calories 423
Calories from Fat 126
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 14g
22%
Saturated Fat 5g
24%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 2g
Monounsaturated Fat 3g
Cholesterol 83mg
28%
Sodium 601mg
25%
Total Carbohydrates 35g
12%
Dietary Fiber 8g
32%
Sugars 9g
Protein 41g
Vitamin A
237%
Vitamin C
308%
Calcium
39%
Iron
22%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 3 medium carrots
  2. 1 large head of broccoli
  3. 300g salmon fillet in small cubes
  4. 50g gluten free cream cheese
  5. 100ml natural yoghurt
  6. 1 tsp mixed herbs
  7. seasoning
  8. 3 slices of gluten free bread made into breadcrumbs
  9. 50g grated cheddar cheese
Instructions
  1. Peel and chop the carrots then cook in boiling water until soft, add the broccoli for the last few minutes of cooking.
  2. Place the salmon and vegetables in a large bowl.
  3. Mix the cream cheese and yoghurt together with the herbs and season.
  4. Stir the creamy mix into the salmon and veggies.
  5. Spoon it all into an ovenproof dish, then top with the breadcrumbs and finally the cheese.
  6. Bake for 35-40 minutes at Gas Mark 6/200C.
  7. Serve with a green salad.
Notes
  1. Can be made ahead of time and cooked later and can be frozen.
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calories
423
fat
14g
protein
41g
carbs
35g
more
Dietitian UK https://www.dietitianuk.co.uk/
Why not serve this with a green salad and a cheeky glass of white wine?

Spiced Vegetable Moroccan Soup

The weather has turned distinctly chilly, so we’ve turned to soups for our lunches. I love soups as they really are easy to make, they can be an easy way to get vegetables and great nurtitious food into the family and they heat up the insides. This soup was a bit of an experiment, it has a different edge to it with the cinnamon, cumin and lemon. It really does work and makes a fresh, tingly on the tastebuds soup. 

To make this a complete lunch we ate ours wih rice cakes and finished with a yoghurt.

Spiced Moroccan Vegetable Soup
Serves 5
A zingy, spiced vegetable soup inspired by Moroccan flavours, quick, easy, healthy, low fat and packed with goodness.
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Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
20 min
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
20 min
160 calories
36 g
0 g
2 g
4 g
0 g
203 g
94 g
5 g
0 g
1 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
203g
Servings
5
Amount Per Serving
Calories 160
Calories from Fat 18
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 2g
3%
Saturated Fat 0g
2%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0g
Monounsaturated Fat 1g
Cholesterol 0mg
0%
Sodium 94mg
4%
Total Carbohydrates 36g
12%
Dietary Fiber 3g
12%
Sugars 5g
Protein 4g
Vitamin A
246%
Vitamin C
45%
Calcium
6%
Iron
14%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 1/2 tbsp olive oil
  2. 1 onion finely chopped
  3. 2 garlic cloves
  4. 1 tsp cinnamon
  5. 1 tsp cumin
  6. 1 chopped chilli
  7. 2 tbsp tomato puree
  8. 150g dried apricots chopped
  9. zest 1 lemon
  10. juice 1/2 lemon or 4 tbsp
  11. 4 carrots
  12. 150ml stock
  13. 200g greens (spinach, kale or Swiss chard)
Instructions
  1. Gently cook the onion, then add the garlic, cinnamon, cumin, chilli and tomato puree. Cook for a couple of minutes.
  2. Add the chopped apricpts, lemon zest and lemon juice, stir.
  3. Now add the carrots, greens and stock.
  4. Simmer for 20 minutes, then blend.
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calories
160
fat
2g
protein
4g
carbs
36g
more
Dietitian UK https://www.dietitianuk.co.uk/

Sausage and Roasted Tomato Bake

This week my Archchi came to visit. This is my  Sri-lankan grandmother, fondly known to the whole family as Archchi (granny in Singhala). She lives in London and has the greenest fingers of anyone I know. Years ago she had 2 allotments, now its just her garden that produces mainly vegetables, lots of vegetables. From her recent visit I ended up with 3kg cherry tomatoes, 3 red cabbages, a large carrier bag full of apples and a pile of greens plus coriander. Lush.

The cherry tomatoes were at the stage of needing to be eaten so I decided to roast them with garlic, rosemary and balsamic vinegar. Top this off with sausages and you have a super simple, yet tasty meal. Went down very well with the family and I got the comments of “succulent, tasty and satisfying” from the husband, followed but mmmmmm from the toddler. Praise indeed.

Dietitian UK. Cherry tomatoes ready to roast
Dietitian UK. Cherry tomatoes ready to roast

I used gluten free sausages for ours and served it with rice but you could serve it with pasta, polenta or mashed potato.

Sausage and Roasted Tomato Bake
Serves 4
A simple to make but super tasty one tray sausage and tomato bake.
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Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
1 hr
Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
1 hr
364 calories
15 g
69 g
26 g
18 g
9 g
410 g
626 g
9 g
0 g
15 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
410g
Servings
4
Amount Per Serving
Calories 364
Calories from Fat 237
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 26g
40%
Saturated Fat 9g
43%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 4g
Monounsaturated Fat 11g
Cholesterol 69mg
23%
Sodium 626mg
26%
Total Carbohydrates 15g
5%
Dietary Fiber 5g
19%
Sugars 9g
Protein 18g
Vitamin A
81%
Vitamin C
186%
Calcium
6%
Iron
14%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 1kg cherry tomatoes
  2. 8 sausages
  3. 2 peppers chopped up into chunks
  4. 4 cloves garlic
  5. balsamic vinegar
  6. olive oil
  7. fresh rosemary
  8. 2 tsp dried oregano
  9. Black pepper
Instructions
  1. Place the tomatoes in a baking tray, in a single layer.
  2. Chop the garlic finely and add to the tomatoe.
  3. Add a good glug of olive oil and balsamic vinegar, top with the oregano and some sprigs of rosemary.
  4. Season well with black pepper.
  5. Place the sausages on top and stir to coat it all in the seasoning, then place the sausages back on the top.
  6. Bake at Gas Mark 5 for 30 minutes, then turn the sausages and bake for another 15-30 minutes depending how well done you like your sausages.
  7. Remove the sausages and keep warm.
  8. Place the baking tray on the hob and gently simmer the sauce, squish some of the tomatoes and reduce it down a little.
  9. Serve potates/rice/pasta/polenta topped with the tomatoes, with 2 sausages per person on top.
  10. Add a green salad for extra vegetables, colour and crunch.
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calories
364
fat
26g
protein
18g
carbs
15g
more
Dietitian UK https://www.dietitianuk.co.uk/

Low Fat, Slow Cooker Rice Pudding

I’ve become a bit of a rice pudding addict of late. There is something about that creamy goodness that just appeals to me, I love it cold, straight from the fridge, either on it’s own or with some fruit. I usually buy it, but a bit of a shopping failure meant the fridge was bare. Myself and the toddler went shopping far too late in the day, both tired, we got round the shop, picked up all our items and then found long queues at the checkout. Neither small girl nor me were in the mood to wait around, she was on the verge of a mini melt-down, I had no patience and so we gave up! 

So later on I found some pudding rice in the cupboard and hey presto I’ve discovered just how easy it is to make rice pudding in my slow cooker, it’s a low fat version too and  a whole lot cheaper than buying it. It took 2 1/2 hours but was literally a “bung it in, switch it on and come back later” recipe. Check it out.

Slow Cooker Rice Pudding
Serves 12
Easy, peasy, rice pudding, made in the slow cooker.
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Prep Time
10 min
Prep Time
10 min
98 calories
14 g
11 g
3 g
4 g
2 g
142 g
83 g
14 g
0 g
1 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
142g
Servings
12
Amount Per Serving
Calories 98
Calories from Fat 26
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 3g
4%
Saturated Fat 2g
9%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0g
Monounsaturated Fat 1g
Cholesterol 11mg
4%
Sodium 83mg
3%
Total Carbohydrates 14g
5%
Dietary Fiber 0g
0%
Sugars 14g
Protein 4g
Vitamin A
5%
Vitamin C
0%
Calcium
16%
Iron
0%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 200g pudding rice
  2. 60g sugar
  3. 1400ml semi skimmed milk
  4. nutmeg
Instructions
  1. Pop all the ingredients in the slow cooker, switch it on to high and leave it for 2 1/2 hours.
  2. It will thicken up slightly more and stay warm if you leave it switched off in the slow cooker for 15 minutes or so.
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calories
98
fat
3g
protein
4g
carbs
14g
more
Dietitian UK https://www.dietitianuk.co.uk/

Baby Food: Why it’s better to make your own.

A Glasgow team have tested 479 shop bought baby foods and found that most of them had fewer nutrients than homemade versions. They also found that the majority of the foods (65%) were sweet in taste, sweetened with fruit sugar rather than sugar itself. Finger foods expecially were found to be sweet.

baby-food-jars-15118476

A quote from the researchers “UK infant mainly supplies sweet, soft, spoonable foods targeted from age 4 months”

Babies have an innate preference for sweet foods and breast milk itself has a sweet taste to it, however when it comes to weaning we want to be encouraging our small ones to extend their palate. Offering a range of tastes, textures and flavours will do this, by sticking to sweeter tastes babies will be more likely to want sweet foods later in life which could lead to less healthy choices.

The nutritional composition of the baby foods was looked at and the researchers found that babies would  need to eat twice as much shop bought foods to get the same energy and protein as a homecooked meal. This makes it pretty hard work for a baby to meet their nutritional needs.

So is there a role for shop bought baby foods and should manufacturers be changing their meals?

I would say there still is a role for these foods. We all need a balance of foods in our diets and being a mum I know full well that there are occasions when a pouch or jar of baby food can be so much easier. Try to stick to homemade meals as often as you can and keep the bought versions for those emergency occasions. I’ve certainly used bought baby meals when abroad on holiday for example and when out and about with no other options. 

My top tip would be to aim for 80% of the diet to be homemade, be realistic about your time, plan meals, cook in bulk and freeze and don’t beat yourself up if you resort to shop bought food now and again.

Why not check out some of my weaning recipes or check out my Baby Weaning Ebooks. 

Read the abstract of the study here.

Gluten Free Ginger Biscuits Recipe, baking with the toddler.

Baking and cooking with my toddler is a very regular occurrence, it’s one activity that I find teaches her lots, keeps us both amused and we get to eat the results.

So here is out latest recipe, in the final stages of pregnancy I had a bit of morning sickness creeping back in, so these ginger biscuits were a cunning ploy to help me get through the day. They have a great texture, in fact you won’t know they are gluten free and they last week in the biscuit tin.

 

Plant Based Protein

Blog post written for Slimsticks.com 

Eating a more plant based diet is becoming increasingly popular and the current research is suggesting it’s the way to go. If you don’t want to go the whole “hog” then why not have a few meat free days in your week?

 A plant based diet is thought to reduce the risk of several cancers including throat, stomach, colon, prostrate and oesophagus. For example eating too much red meat and processed meat increases your risk of colon cancer. Eating more fruit, vegetables, nuts and seeds leads to a diet lower in fat and calories so can help you lose weight or maintain a healthy weight. A plant based diet is also higher in fibre, antioxidants and phytochemicals, all of which can help prevent disease such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes and cancer.

 But eating a more vegetarian diet does mean you need to plan and be a bit organised. Plant based protein foods do not contain the full complement of amino acids which can leave you lacking in protein. Therefore it is important to ensure that you eat a range of different protein foods. Good choices include nuts, fish, seeds, beans, legumes, eggs, cheese, dairy, tofu, quinoa and soya. 

 

Beans:lentils

Top tips for plant based protein:

  • Add seeds to salads and stir fries.
  • Top cereals with slivered nuts.
  • Experiment with beans, add them to curries, chilli, casseroles and salads.
  • Lentils make a great thickened for soups.
  • Hummous and nut butters are great at lunchtimes.
  • Stock up the freezer with a range of protein sources so you don’t run short.
  • Try bean chilli instead of beef chilli or using quorn mince as a minced beef substitute.
  • Eggs are fast, fantastic and packed full of protein – omelettes, frittata’s, boiled, scrambled, poached are all healthy options.

 

Visualisation leads to better dietary change

An interesting piece of research caught my eye this week. A team of psychology researchers in Montreal looked into how using mental imagery techniques may increase the likelihood of people eating more fruit and vegetables. They asked 177 students to aim to eat more fruit over the next 7 days. Those who planned, wrote it down and visualised how they were going to do it (e.g. where and when they would buy, prepare and eat the fruit) were twice as likely to increase their consumption.

 Plant-Based-Foods

This was based on sports psychology. “Athletes do lots of work mentally rehearsing their performances before competing and it’s often very successful. So we thought having people mentally rehearse how they were going to buy and eat their fruit should make it more likely that they would actually do it. And this is exactly what happened,” says Bärbel Knäuper.

 

As a dietitian part of my job is helping people plan how they will manage to alter their eating habits so this research is further evidence that planning really is key. Talking through with someone what your long term goals are, how you can put them into place and having a short term goal to achieve are vital components of achieving dietary change.

 

 

Reference:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21337259